Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bicyclists Willing to Ride Up to 3 Miles to Catch Bus, Train

16.01.2015

If three American metro areas are any indication, few people ride their bicycles to a bus or train station to commute to work, and those who do only travel an average of 1 to 2 miles. That suggests to a University of Florida researcher that American cities should make the 2-mile radius around transit hubs more bike-friendly.

Methods to do so could include installing bicycle lanes separated from vehicular traffic, adding off-street multipurpose paths for pedestrians and bicyclists and converting car lanes to bike-only lanes, said UF geomatics Associate Professor Henry Hochmair.


Amy L. Stuart UF/IFAS photographer

Up to 4 percent of those who take a bus or train to work rode bicycles to get to the transit hub, new UF/IFAS research shows. Those bicyclists pedaled an average of 2 miles to the stations, according to data analyzed by UF/IFAS geomatics Associate Professor Henry Hochmair.

Hochmair reached his conclusions by studying data collected by transit agencies from passengers who rode trains and buses in three metro areas – Atlanta, Los Angeles and Minneapolis-St. Paul.

From those who completed the survey, Hochmair analyzed trips from 157 people in Los Angeles, 66 in Atlanta and 99 in Minneapolis who rode their bikes to access transit – 2.3 percent, 0.3 percent, and 4.2 percent, respectively. In Hochmair’s data analysis, those who opted to ride a bike to a transit hub cycled an average of 1 to 2 miles in Atlanta and the Twin Cities and 3 miles in Los Angeles.

Hochmair had expected to find more people riding their bicycles to transit hubs based on statistics on commuters from other countries. He cited the Netherlands, where 35 percent of those who ride the bus or train take their bikes to a transit hub.

“That shows what would be possible with appropriate infrastructure and transit policies,” he said.

Bicycling fatalities are up recently. Florida deaths rose by 37 from 2010 to 2012, up to 120, according to a 2012 study by the Governors Highway Safety Association, a nonprofit group that pushes government to improve bicycle safety. These figures underscore Hochmair’s push for better bicycle infrastructure, which may bring the added bonus of more cyclists to transit hubs.

But there are challenges.

Since U.S. cities are built for cars, using five- or six-lane highways, surrounded by shopping centers and subdivisions, there is little room or incentive for alternative transportation, Hochmair said. Additionally, roads in many neighborhoods often contain cul-de-sacs and looping roads, resulting in longer distances for bicyclists to travel. This further discourages bicycling in urban and suburban areas, he said.

Hochmair, who conducts research from UF’s Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, said his study’s findings are critical to reducing vehicular traffic.

“The overall goal of transportation planners is to reduce the dependency on individual car traffic and reduce congestion,” said Hochmair, an Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences faculty member. The average U.S. commute time for a full-time worker is 23 minutes by car, thus too far to walk and possibly too far to cycle, he said. “Using bike and transit combined is a viable alternative to car traffic.”

As part of his research program, Hochmair uses geographic information systems to quantify how road and transit hub designs affect people’s travel behavior and how improving those networks can make transportation more sustainable, for example, by encouraging cycling, walking, and riding buses and trains.

“The over-dependency on cars and lack of physical activity has led to dramatically increased rates of obesity, which makes the facilitation and promotion of physical activity, including walking and cycling, a high public health priority,” he said.
Hochmair’s research is published in the current issue of International Journal of Sustainable Transportation.

UF’s geomatics program, offered at the Fort Lauderdale REC, offers degree programs including professional surveying, geographic information systems, global positioning systems, photogrammetry, cartography and remote sensing.


By Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu
Source: Henry Hochmair, 954-577-6317, hhhochmair@ufl.edu

Brad Buck | newswise
Further information:
http://www.ufl.edu

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht New players, standardization and digitalization for more rail freight transport
16.07.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht A helping (Sens)Hand
11.04.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel Material for Shipbuilding

A new research project at the TH Mittelhessen focusses on the development of a novel light weight design concept for leisure boats and yachts. Professor Stephan Marzi from the THM Institute of Mechanics and Materials collaborates with Krake Catamarane, which is a shipyard located in Apolda, Thuringia.

The project is set up in an international cooperation with Professor Anders Biel from Karlstad University in Sweden and the Swedish company Lamera from...

Im Focus: Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal

Superconductivity has fascinated scientists for many years since it offers the potential to revolutionize current technologies. Materials only become superconductors - meaning that electrons can travel in them with no resistance - at very low temperatures. These days, this unique zero resistance superconductivity is commonly found in a number of technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Future technologies, however, will harness the total synchrony of electronic behavior in superconductors - a property called the phase. There is currently a...

Im Focus: How Do the Strongest Magnets in the Universe Form?

How do some neutron stars become the strongest magnets in the Universe? A German-British team of astrophysicists has found a possible answer to the question of how these so-called magnetars form. Researchers from Heidelberg, Garching, and Oxford used large computer simulations to demonstrate how the merger of two stars creates strong magnetic fields. If such stars explode in supernovae, magnetars could result.

How Do the Strongest Magnets in the Universe Form?

Im Focus: Liquifying a rocky exoplanet

A hot, molten Earth would be around 5% larger than its solid counterpart. This is the result of a study led by researchers at the University of Bern. The difference between molten and solid rocky planets is important for the search of Earth-like worlds beyond our Solar System and the understanding of Earth itself.

Rocky exoplanets that are around Earth-size are comparatively small, which makes them incredibly difficult to detect and characterise using telescopes. What...

Im Focus: Axion particle spotted in solid-state crystal

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Princeton University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spotted a famously elusive particle: The axion – first predicted 42 years ago as an elementary particle in extensions of the standard model of particle physics.

The team found signatures of axion particles composed of Weyl-type electrons (Weyl fermions) in the correlated Weyl semimetal (TaSe₄)₂I. At room temperature,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Symposium on Functional Materials for Electrolysis, Fuel Cells and Metal-Air Batteries

02.10.2019 | Event News

NEXUS 2020: Relationships Between Architecture and Mathematics

02.10.2019 | Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

How to control friction in topological insulators

14.10.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

The shelf life of pyrite

14.10.2019 | Earth Sciences

Shipment tracking for "fat parcels" in the body

14.10.2019 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>