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Genome Biology’s first Impact Factor – 9.71

21.06.2006
Genome Biology’s first Impact Factor of 9.71 confirms the journal as one of the top titles in biology. The journal’s first Impact Factor places it in the top five of research journals in the highly competitive Genetics and Heredity field, and the 4th most cited journal in Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology.

Genome Biology is BioMed Central’s flagship title covering biology in the post-genomic era. Genome Biology publishes articles from the full spectrum of biology and makes all research articles available free of charge on the website. Launched in 2001 and among the first open access journals to be published by BioMed Central, Genome Biology was also the first journal that from its inception placed all research articles in full in PubMed Central immediately on publication.

Dr Theodora Bloom, Editorial Director for Biology at BioMed Central and the founding editor of Genome Biology, is delighted, “Genome Biology was a real trailblazer in the development of open access journals and it was important that we demonstrate high editorial standards and an ability to attract the best research. Genome Biology quickly established a reputation for quality that has been affirmed by the 2005 Impact Factor. The whole team are thrilled and looking forward to seeing more exceptional research submitted to the journal.”

BioMed Central's Publisher, Dr Matthew Cockerill, agrees, "Genome Biology's impressive Impact Factor is evidence of BioMed Central's commitment to quality, and shows that top researchers at the cutting edge of biology are increasingly choosing open access publication for their best work."

To date, Genome Biology has published over 2,900 articles, including important papers from the labs of many top names in the field including Mark Gerstein, Eugene Koonin, John Quackenbush, Gerry Rubin and Chris Sander. Professor Mark Gerstein of Yale University (USA), who has published five research articles in the journal, one of which has already been cited more than 40 times, said, “I am delighted by Genome Biology's Impact Factor. This underscores the popularity of genomics and open access publishing."

Genome Biology is widely read, with over 45,000 registrants and well over 100,000 article downloads each month. In all, the Genome Biology website has recorded more than 4.9 million article downloads since the journal launched.

Subjects covered include any aspect of molecular, cellular, organismal or population biology studied from a genomic or post-genomic perspective, as well as genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, genomic methods (including structure prediction), computational biology, sequence analysis (including large-scale and cross-genome analyses), comparative biology and evolution. The journal also publishes reviews, meeting reports, opinion pieces, commentaries and editorials on a broad range of topics, including political, scientific, and medical issues relating to genomic, post-genomic and genome-scale analyses.

Genome Biology is published by BioMed Central Ltd., a member of the Science Navigation Group. The publication has a dedicated editorial team in-house, working with an international Advisory Board, advisors and contributors. Genome Biology offers a very fast publication schedule whilst maintaining rigorous peer-review.

Grace Baynes | alfa
Further information:
http://www.biomedcentral.com

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