Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

World Wide Web Consortium Issues Proposed Recommendation of SOAP Version 1.2

07.05.2003


W3C XML Protocol Working Group Requests Final Review of XML-based solution for Data Transport



The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) today releases the SOAP Version 1.2 Proposed Recommendation, consisting of the SOAP 1.2 Messaging Framework; SOAP 1.2 Adjuncts, and a Primer. SOAP 1.2 is a lightweight protocol intended for exchanging structured information in a decentralized, distributed environment such as the Web. A W3C Proposed Recommendation is issued after review by the W3C Director, W3C Working Groups and the developer public, with evidence of implementation and interoperability. SOAP 1.2 has been sent to the W3C Membership for final review, which closes on 7 June 2003.

"Starting today, developers who may have hesitated to pick up SOAP 1.2 should take a look," stated Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director. "After resolving over 400 issues - including over 150 from SOAP/1.1 and delivering evidence of rigorous implementations, the W3C XML Protocol Working Group has produced for final review a real SOAP standard - SOAP 1.2."


Robust Web Services Rely on Standardized, Flexible Models for Message Exchange

Data transport is central to modern computing in the networked, decentralized, and distributed environment that is the Web. As XML has emerged as the preferred format for data, the challenge is for both the sender and the receiver to agree on an application level transfer protocol - whether the transfer is to occur between software programs, machines, or organizations.

Since its inception in September 2000, W3C’’s XML Protocol Working Group has worked on both XML Protocol Requirements and the SOAP 1.2 specification, using the W3C Note SOAP/1.1 as a starting point. After producing multiple drafts, receiving significant feedback from developers, and identifying interoperable implementations, the W3C XML Protocol Working Group (WG) believes its work on SOAP 1.2 is complete.

SOAP 1.2 Provides Stable Support for W3C Recommendations, Refined Processing Model

The XML Protocol WG has the goal of developing technologies which enable two or more peers to communicate in a distributed environment, using XML as the encapsulation language. Their solution allows a layered architecture on top of a simple and extensible messaging format, which provides robustness, simplicity, reusability and interoperability.

SOAP 1.2 provides a framework for XML-based messaging systems, in two parts - the Message Framework and Adjuncts.

SOAP 1.2 Message Framework provides a processing model (the rules for processing a SOAP message), an extensibility framework (enabling developers to use extensions inside and outside the SOAP envelope), the message construct (the rules for constructing SOAP messages), and the protocol binding framework (the rules for specifying the exchange of SOAP messages over underlying protocols such as HTTP).

SOAP 1.2 Adjuncts defines a set of adjuncts. It includes rules for representing remote procedure calls (RPCs), for encoding SOAP messages, for describing SOAP features and SOAP bindings. It also provides a standard binding of SOAP to HTTP 1.1, allowing SOAP messages to be exchanged using the mechanisms of the World Wide Web.

In addition to fulfilling requirements spelled out in the WG charter, SOAP 1.2 integrates core XML technologies. SOAP 1.2 is designed to work seamlessly with W3C XML schemas, maximizing SOAP’s utility with a broad range of XML tools, and paving the way for future work on WSDL. It also makes use of XML Namespaces as a flexible and lightweight mechanism for handling XML language mixing.

SOAP 1.2 describes a refined processing model, thus removing ambiguities found in SOAP/1.1, and it includes improved error messages, thus helping developers to write better applications.

Implementation Experience Puts SOAP 1.2 in Strong Position for Final Review

After its Candidate Recommendation period, the W3C XML Protocol WG tracked seven SOAP 1.2 implementations from W3C Member organizations and independent developers to ensure the viability and interoperability of implementations based on the specification. The WG had already identified and resolved over 400 technical and editorial issues raised in public review of both the previous SOAP/1.1 specification and the resultant SOAP 1.2 specification.

Current members of the Working Group include industry and technology leaders such as: AT&T; BEA Systems; Canon; DaimlerChrysler Research and Technology; Ericsson; Fujitsu Limited; IBM; IONA Technologies; Macromedia; Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.; Microsoft Corporation; Oracle Corporation; SAP AG; SeeBeyond; Software AG; Sonic Software; Sun Microsystems; Systinet; TIBCO Software Inc.; and Unisys.

Developer communities outside of the W3C membership and other organizations with related interests have provided valuable input to the creation of SOAP Version 1.2.

Marie-Claire Forgue | alfa
Further information:
http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap12-pressrelease.html.en

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Open source software helps researchers extract key insights from huge sensor datasets
22.03.2019 | Universität des Saarlandes

nachricht Touchscreens go 3D with buttons that pulsate and vibrate under your fingertips
14.03.2019 | Universität des Saarlandes

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The taming of the light screw

DESY and MPSD scientists create high-order harmonics from solids with controlled polarization states, taking advantage of both crystal symmetry and attosecond electronic dynamics. The newly demonstrated technique might find intriguing applications in petahertz electronics and for spectroscopic studies of novel quantum materials.

The nonlinear process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in gases is one of the cornerstones of attosecond science (an attosecond is a billionth of a...

Im Focus: Magnetic micro-boats

Nano- and microtechnology are promising candidates not only for medical applications such as drug delivery but also for the creation of little robots or flexible integrated sensors. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have created magnetic microparticles, with a newly developed method, that could pave the way for building micro-motors or guiding drugs in the human body to a target, like a tumor. The preparation of such structures as well as their remote-control can be regulated using magnetic fields and therefore can find application in an array of domains.

The magnetic properties of a material control how this material responds to the presence of a magnetic field. Iron oxide is the main component of rust but also...

Im Focus: Self-healing coating made of corn starch makes small scratches disappear through heat

Due to the special arrangement of its molecules, a new coating made of corn starch is able to repair small scratches by itself through heat: The cross-linking via ring-shaped molecules makes the material mobile, so that it compensates for the scratches and these disappear again.

Superficial micro-scratches on the car body or on other high-gloss surfaces are harmless, but annoying. Especially in the luxury segment such surfaces are...

Im Focus: Stellar cartography

The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first image of the surface magnetic field of another star. In a paper in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the PEPSI team presents a Zeeman- Doppler-Image of the surface of the magnetically active star II Pegasi.

A special technique allows astronomers to resolve the surfaces of faraway stars. Those are otherwise only seen as point sources, even in the largest telescopes...

Im Focus: Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

"This source of radiation lets us look at reality through a new angle - it is like twisting a mirror and discovering something completely different," says...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Solving the efficiency of Gram-negative bacteria

22.03.2019 | Life Sciences

Bacteria bide their time when antibiotics attack

22.03.2019 | Life Sciences

Open source software helps researchers extract key insights from huge sensor datasets

22.03.2019 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>