High resolution techniques reveal clues in 3.5 billion-year-old biomass

Barite quarry in the “Dresser Formation” of the Pilbara Craton. This rocks are around 3.5 million years old and contain evidence of microbial life.
Credit: Jan-Peter Duda

Research team analyses organic material from the early Earth tracing its origin and composition.

To learn about the first organisms on our planet, researchers have to analyse the rocks of the early Earth. These can only be found in a few places on the surface of the Earth. The Pilbara Craton in Western Australia is one of these rare sites: there are rocks there that are around 3.5 billion years old containing traces of the microorganisms that lived at that time. A research team led by the University of Göttingen has now found new clues about the formation and composition of this ancient biomass, providing insights into the earliest ecosystems on Earth. The results were published in the journal Precambrian Research.

Using high-resolution techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS), the researchers analysed carbonaceous particles found rocks made of barium sulphate. This enabled scientists to obtain important information about the structure of microscopically small particles and show that they are of biological origin. It is likely that the particles were deposited as sediment in the body of water of a “caldera” – a large cauldron-shaped hollow that forms after volcanic activity. In addition, some of the particles must have been transported and changed by hydrothermal waters just beneath the surface of the volcano. This indicates a turbulent history of sediment deposits. By analysing various carbon isotopes, the researchers concluded that different types of microorganisms were already living in the vicinity of the volcanic activity, similar to those found today at Icelandic geysers or at hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

The study not only sheds light on the Earth’s past, but is also interesting from a methodological point of view. First author Lena Weimann, Göttingen University’s Geosciences Centre, explains: “It was very exciting to be able to combine a range of high-resolution techniques, which enabled us to derive information about the history of how the organic particles were deposited and their origin. As our findings show, original traces of the first organisms can still be found even from extremely old material.”

Original publication: Weimann, L. et al. Carbonaceous matter in ~3.5 Ga black bedded barite from the Dresser Formation (Pilbara Craton, Western Australia) – insights into organic cycling on the juvenile Earth. Precambrian Research (2024). DOI: 10.1016/j.precamres.2024.107321 

Contact:

Lena Weimann
University of Göttingen
Geosciences Centre
Abteilung Geobiologie
Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen
Telefon: 0551 39-22478
E-Mail: lena.weimann@uni-goettingen.de
Internet: www.uni-goettingen.de/de/656265.html

Journal: Precambrian Research
DOI: 10.1016/j.precamres.2024.107321
Method of Research: Experimental study
Subject of Research: Not applicable
Article Title: Carbonaceous matter in ~3.5 Ga black bedded barite from the Dresser Formation (Pilbara Craton, Western Australia) – insights into organic cycling on the juvenile Earth
Article Publication Date: 19-Feb-2024

 

Media Contact

Melissa Sollich
University of Göttingen
melissa.sollich@uni-goettingen.de
Office: 49-551-392-6228

Media Contact

Melissa Sollich
University of Göttingen

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Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

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