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Innovations from the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology

Understanding nature and transferring its traits to technology is not only the objective of bionics, but also of marine biology and microbiology.

Bionics, marine biology or microbiology. Here you can find scientific reports and articles about achievements and developments in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Technical research departments at many universities and institutes are examining and learning from nature and then collaborating with the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Although Arnold Gehlen once labeled humanity as a "flawed being" that had to create its own culture to survive nature's environment, we can be certain he had not yet considered the opportunities presented by bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Science is meanwhile using the traits of the flawed being to contemplate how to utilize bionics, marine biology and microbiology to copy animals, plants and the rest of the environment. Because nature features attributes such as the hardest and most durable materials and efficient energy production and conversion, it has become a treasure trove of knowledge for bionics, marine biology and microbiology. As a stand-alone branch of research, science can use bionics to demonstrate that nature is superior to humans in many aspects and that we still have a lot to learn from it, whether in macro or microbiology.

Bionics takes the leap from comics to research

The "Bionic Six" comic and animated television series revolved around a family who collaborated with a researcher to utilize the attributes of nature to combat those intent on destroying it. The "Bionic Six" acquired their power and speed through bionics. They knew how to take advantage of the physical forces of nature and were already advancing into the fields of marine biology and microbiology research. Today, bionics is a well-respected field of research that has little to do with children's entertainment. Bionics occupies itself with nature's "inventions" and works closely with the fields of marine biology and microbiology to transfer their attributes to the human culture. Bionics has already proved its worth in the fields of materials research and nano technology. Bionics and microbiology have also made progress in areas such as energy production and storage.

Marine biology and microbiology - two close partners

Marine biology has enjoyed new impetus over the past several years. Although researchers have long been occupied with both fields, marine biology and microbiology were thrust into the public spotlight no later than with the publication of "The Swarm", a novel by German author Frank Schätzing. Over the last year, marine biology and microbiology reports revealed that although scientists have unearthed a wealth of new discoveries in marine biology and microbiology, there remain thousands of undiscovered animal species in both areas. Microbiology is actually a vital part of marine biology since the ocean depths contain not only large animals, but also organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye. And this is where microbiology comes into play. Marine biology and microbiology are engaged in examining the effects of currents, depths and temperatures on the development and propagation of organisms and animals. For this reason, marine biology and microbiology researchers are working to discover new animal species and organisms, all the while further expanding the depths of geography and science. When marine biology and microbiology come together with bionics, this can result in unimagined discoveries and thus the development of new methods that humans can implement for their own benefit and for the protection of the environment. The latest achievements in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology can be found in innovations-report.

Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Latest News:

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Retracing the Roots of Fungal Symbioses

Understanding how plants and fungi developed symbiotic relationships

With apologies to the poet John Donne, and based on recent work from the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science...

27.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

Moving molecule writes letters

Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics

On the search for high performance materials for applications such as gas storage, thermal insulators or dynamic nanosystems it is essential to understand the...

27.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

Newly discovered algal species helps corals survive in the hottest reefs on the planet

A new species of algae has been discovered in reef corals of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf where it helps corals to survive seawater temperatures of up to 36 degrees Celsius - temperatures that would kill corals elsewhere.

Researchers from the University of Southampton and the New York University Abu Dhabi identified the symbiotic algae in corals from Abu Dhabi, United Arab...

27.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

A gene for brain size - only found in humans

Following the traces of evolution: Max Planck Researchers find a key to the reproduction of brain stem cells

About 99 percent of human genes are shared with chimpanzees. Only the small remainder sets us apart. However, we have one important difference: The brain of...

27.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

Living in the genetic comfort zone: how to avoid the influence of genetic variation

The phenotype of organisms is shaped by the interaction between environmental factors and their genetic constitution. A recent study by a team of population geneticists at the Vetmeduni Vienna shows that fruit flies live in a sort of genetic comfort zone at a specific temperature. The scientists found that, despite their underlying genetic differences, two separate strains of flies had a very similar gene expression pattern at 18°C. This effect of ‘canalization’, which has also been described in humans, allows organisms to continue to grow and develop stable even in the face of genetic and environmental stress. The results were published in the journal PLOS Genetics.

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the...

27.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

Scientists Find a Key Protein That Allows Plavix to Conquer Platelets

The findings could lead to more personalized approaches to controlling platelet activity during heart attacks and other vascular emergencies and diseases.

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix,...

26.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

Carnivorous Plant Packs Big Wonders Into Tiny Genome

More isn’t always better when it comes to DNA

Great, wonderful, wacky things can come in small genomic packages.

26.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

Brain Makes Decisions with Same Method Used to Break WW2 Enigma Code

When making simple decisions, neurons in the brain apply the same statistical trick used by Alan Turing to help break Germany’s Enigma code during World War...

26.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

Amphibian chytrid fungus reaches Madagascar Over 290 endemic species are at risk

The chytrid fungus, which is fatal to amphibians, has been detected in Madagascar for the first time. This means that the chytridiomycosis pandemic has now reached a biodiversity hotspot. 

Researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and TU Braunschweig, together with international colleagues, are therefore proposing an...

26.02.2015 | nachricht Read more

New resource for aging research: Genome of turquoise killifish publicly available as clone library

The turquoise killifish (N. furzeri) has a lifespan between 3 and 10 months and is the shortest-lived vertebrate species that can be bred in captivity. Over recent years researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Age Research (FLI) in Jena established N. furzeri as a new vertebrate model for studying biomedical aspects of aging.

FLI researchers together with colleagues from the Clemson University Genomics and Computational Laboratory (USA) have now made the genome of N. furzeri...

26.02.2015 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Moving molecule writes letters

Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics

On the search for high performance materials for applications such as gas storage, thermal insulators or dynamic nanosystems it is essential to understand the...

Im Focus: Geysers have loops in their plumbing

Periodic eruptions tied to underground bends and side-chambers that trap steam bubbles

Geysers like Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park erupt periodically because of loops or side-chambers in their underground plumbing, according to recent...

Im Focus: Noncontact and contamination-free materials inspection – hybrid materials easily tested

In various industries such as automotive industry, aircraft or steel construction failures in the final product can quickly lead to malfunction and, as a result, can massively compromise the operational reliability. Thus, nondestructive testing methods will play a key role in the quality assurance because they allow to inspect components and parts without destroying them.

From 10 to 12 March 2015, at the JEC Europe in Paris, engineers of Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will introduce a novel procedure which enables noncontact and...

Im Focus: Infrared emitters and UV lamps speed up production and improve quality

The coating of foils, the printing of labels or the gluing of electronic components are very different and demanding applications. They all require innovative production processes to remain nice to look at, durable and scratch-proof. Heraeus Noblelight infrared and UV systems increase production speed and improve the quality of the drying process.

Easy retrofitting at a paper coating line

Im Focus: NIH researchers reveal link between powerful gene regulatory elements and autoimmune diseases

Findings point to potential drug targets

Investigators with the National Institutes of Health have discovered the genomic switches of a blood cell key to regulating the human immune system. The...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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