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Innovations from the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology

Understanding nature and transferring its traits to technology is not only the objective of bionics, but also of marine biology and microbiology.

Bionics, marine biology or microbiology. Here you can find scientific reports and articles about achievements and developments in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Technical research departments at many universities and institutes are examining and learning from nature and then collaborating with the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Although Arnold Gehlen once labeled humanity as a "flawed being" that had to create its own culture to survive nature's environment, we can be certain he had not yet considered the opportunities presented by bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Science is meanwhile using the traits of the flawed being to contemplate how to utilize bionics, marine biology and microbiology to copy animals, plants and the rest of the environment. Because nature features attributes such as the hardest and most durable materials and efficient energy production and conversion, it has become a treasure trove of knowledge for bionics, marine biology and microbiology. As a stand-alone branch of research, science can use bionics to demonstrate that nature is superior to humans in many aspects and that we still have a lot to learn from it, whether in macro or microbiology.

Bionics takes the leap from comics to research

The "Bionic Six" comic and animated television series revolved around a family who collaborated with a researcher to utilize the attributes of nature to combat those intent on destroying it. The "Bionic Six" acquired their power and speed through bionics. They knew how to take advantage of the physical forces of nature and were already advancing into the fields of marine biology and microbiology research. Today, bionics is a well-respected field of research that has little to do with children's entertainment. Bionics occupies itself with nature's "inventions" and works closely with the fields of marine biology and microbiology to transfer their attributes to the human culture. Bionics has already proved its worth in the fields of materials research and nano technology. Bionics and microbiology have also made progress in areas such as energy production and storage.

Marine biology and microbiology - two close partners

Marine biology has enjoyed new impetus over the past several years. Although researchers have long been occupied with both fields, marine biology and microbiology were thrust into the public spotlight no later than with the publication of "The Swarm", a novel by German author Frank Schätzing. Over the last year, marine biology and microbiology reports revealed that although scientists have unearthed a wealth of new discoveries in marine biology and microbiology, there remain thousands of undiscovered animal species in both areas. Microbiology is actually a vital part of marine biology since the ocean depths contain not only large animals, but also organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye. And this is where microbiology comes into play. Marine biology and microbiology are engaged in examining the effects of currents, depths and temperatures on the development and propagation of organisms and animals. For this reason, marine biology and microbiology researchers are working to discover new animal species and organisms, all the while further expanding the depths of geography and science. When marine biology and microbiology come together with bionics, this can result in unimagined discoveries and thus the development of new methods that humans can implement for their own benefit and for the protection of the environment. The latest achievements in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology can be found in innovations-report.

Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Latest News:

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Nanoparticle Exposure Can Awaken Dormant Viruses in the Lungs

Nanoparticles from combustion engines can activate viruses that are dormant in in lung tissue cells. This is the result of a study by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), which has now been published in the journal ‘Particle and Fibre Toxicology’.

To evade the immune system, some viruses hide in cells of their host and persist there. In medical terminology, this state is referred to as a latent...

16.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

Sensory Stimuli Control Dopamine in the Brain

Type and intensity of stimuli control the activity of nerve cells that release the neurotransmitter dopamine

Regardless of whether we are sitting in a loud aeroplane or walking through a quiet forest clearing, how humans perceive their environment depends on the...

13.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

Cholera bacteria infect more effectively with a simple twist of shape

The bacteria that cause the life-threatening disease cholera may initiate infection by coordinating a wave of mass shapeshifting that allows them to more...

13.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

Diagnostic breakthrough: “Shaking piglets” attributed to previously unidentified virus

Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in “shaking piglets”, making it possible to clearly diagnose the potentially fatal disease. The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research.

Cases of newborn “shaking piglets” have been reported since the 1920s both in Europe and abroad. Yet an additional cause for these congenital tremors has so...

13.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

Survival Artists in the Antarctic

Researchers study the ways in which moss can survive in hostile environments

In order to improve our understanding of the impact climate change has on plant life in the Antarctic, the Rector of the University of Freiburg/Germany, Prof....

12.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

DNA duplicator small enough to hold in your hand

Imagine a "DNA photocopier" small enough to hold in your hand that could identify the bacteria or virus causing an infection even before the symptoms appear.

This possibility is raised by a fundamentally new method for controlling a powerful but finicky process called the polymerase chain reaction. PCR was developed...

12.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

Bacterial protein structure could aid development of new antibiotics

Scientists solve structure of sought-after bacterial protein

Bacterial cells have an added layer of protection, called the cell wall, that animal cells don't. Assembling this tough armor entails multiple steps, some of...

12.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

Positive effect of winter dormancy on cold-blooded cognition

Unlike mammals, amphibians who rest-up during the winter do not forget the memories they made beforehand – this is the surprising discovery of new scientific research published. A new study, by researchers from the Messerli Research Institute of Vetmeduni Vienna and University Vienna and University of Lincoln, reveals that the processes involved in winter dormancy may have a fundamentally different impact on memory in amphibians and mammals. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Researchers from the Messerli Research Institute of Vetmeduni Vienna and University Vienna and University of Lincoln discovered that brumation – the period of...

11.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

Conifer cones bear their ages well, and still move it

Freiburg biologists demonstrate that fossil conifer cones possess the oldest known plant structures which still exhibit movements

Fossil conifer cones can still move their individual seed scales after millions of years. This is the finding of a study conducted by the biologists Dr. Simon...

11.01.2017 | nachricht Read more

The internal clock of cells orchestrates 25 percent of all protein switches

Circadian is the latin meaning for “about a day”. Circadian clocks have evolved to adapt our lives to the daily environmental changes on earth: light and warmth during the day and darkness and cold at night. Scientists at the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried discovered with the help of the mass spectrometry, that more than 25 percent of the molecular protein switches in mouse liver cells change in a daily manner. These rhythmic switches are binding sites for phosphate molecules, that regulate the function of proteins, and thereby the daily metabolic processes in the organ. The study was published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Matthias Mann, head of the department “Proteomics and Signal Transduction” at the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry has optimized, together with his...

11.01.2017 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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