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Robust, easily installed commanding and signaling devices in a modern design

16.03.2015

Siemens at the Hannover Messe 2015: Hall 9, Booth D35

  • Modular commanding and signaling device system in four design ranges
  • Extensive selection of pushbuttons, switches and indicators in various colors and designs for every application
  • Rugged designs with IP69K degree of protection
  • Particularly straightforward, error-free installation and removal thanks to twist prevention and snap-on concept

Sirius Act is a completely new system of commanding and signaling devices developed by Siemens. A modular system, it features a robust design in with IP69K degree of protection, high-level aesthetics and simple operation.

Sirius Act is a completely new system of commanding and signaling devices developed by Siemens. A modular system, it features a robust design with IP69K degree of protection, high-level aesthetics and simple operation.

Users have a choice of a wide range of pushbuttons and emergency stop buttons, selector and key switches and acoustic and optical indicators. The diverse range in metal and plastic versions for front panel mounting can also be combined flexibly with different rear-mounting contact and LED modules. An online configurator simplifies selection and ordering.

The components are connected to the controller via AS-Interface, IO-Link or standard cabling. Thanks to twist prevention and the innovative snap-on concept, the new commanding and signaling devices can be installed quickly and easily without errors even if holes are not keyed.

The new commanding and signaling devices were developed with a particular focus on ease of installation. The snap-on concept used in their design makes it possible to assemble the front element and rear holder quickly without tools. Disassembly is equally rapid thanks to a release lever. A screwed connection with reliable twist prevention means that keyed holes are not essential for reliable device installation.

Sirius Act is a modular product line that enables users to choose from four design ranges in plastic and metal versions to meet their specific application requirements. The front of the holders features different actuators and indicators, while at the rear they provide slots for contact and LED modules. There is sufficient space to accommodate up to three modules side by side and two contact modules one behind the other in each case. The modules are available with screw terminals, spring-type terminals or solder pin connections. Siemens also offers compact units in which the electrical module is permanently attached to the holder. Thanks to its IP69K degree of protection, Sirius Act is unaffected by dust, oils, caustic solutions and extreme environmental influences to the extent that it can safely be cleaned with a high-pressure jet at high-temperatures. Their long mechanical service life and certification for potentially explosive atmospheres makes the new commanding and signaling devices suitable for every application.

Siemens provides an online configurator for fast and convenient component combination and ordering. Single devices, housings and inscriptions can be combined individually to the customer's requirements in the configurator by means of drag and drop. An automatically generated CIN number enables customers to reorder their configuration at any time without having to provide any further details. The online configurator provides download options for documentation, exploded views and connection diagrams too.

For further information about Sirius Act see www.siemens.com/sirius-act


Siemens AG (Berlin and Munich) is a global technology powerhouse that has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality for more than 165 years. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world's largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a major provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions as well as automation, drive and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading provider of medical imaging equipment – such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems – and a leader in laboratory diagnostics as well as clinical IT. In fiscal 2014, which ended on September 30, 2014, Siemens generated revenue from continuing operations of €71.9 billion and net income of €5.5 billion. At the end of September 2014, the company had around 357,000 employees worldwide. Further information is available on the Internet at www.siemens.com


Reference Number: PR2015020121DFEN


Contact


Mr. Peter Jefimiec
Digital Factory Division
Siemens AG

Gleiwitzer Str. 555

90475 Nuremberg

Germany

Tel: +49 (911) 895-7975

peter.jefimiec​@siemens.com

Peter Jefimiec | Siemens Digital Factory

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