Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New laser joining technologies at ‘K 2016’ trade fair

19.09.2016

Every three years, the plastics industry gathers at K, the international trade fair for plastics and rubber in Düsseldorf. The Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will also be attending again and presenting many innovative technologies, such as for joining plastics and metals using ultrashort pulse lasers. From October 19 to 26, you can find the Fraunhofer ILT at the joint Fraunhofer booth SC01 in Hall 7.

K is the world’s largest trade fair for the plastics and rubber industry. As in previous years, the organizers are expecting 3,000 exhibitors and more than 200,000 visitors from around the world. Focus topics this year include industry 4.0, resource efficiency, new materials and lightweight design.


Image 1: Structuring a metal probe with a high-power fiber laser in preparation for a metal-plastic bond.

© Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.


Image 2: Acrylic glass demonstrator fabricated by laser welding, cutting, ablating as well as polymer-metal joining.

© Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

Isotropic joining of plastic and metal

A key factor in lightweight design is the ability to form positive and permanent bonds between metallic and plastic surfaces. There is actually already a known laser method for this, particularly for fiber composite materials used in the aerospace and automotive industries.

The method involves first structuring the metal surface with the laser, then bonding it with the heated plastic surface. Previously, the laser structuring was done in a scanning process that produces lines on the metallic surface.

As part of the HyBriLight project funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), specialists at Fraunhofer ILT developed a new process for structuring that uses an ultrashort pulse (USP) laser, which produces cone-like protrusions (CLP) on the metal. These randomly distributed micro-elevations increase the surface area five- to tenfold.

As a result, the bond is not only stronger, but also equal in all directions because, unlike with the scan lines, the surface now has an isotropic structure. The process has been tested in the lab and also works for injection molding with metallic inserts. This method will also be on display with a large demonstrator (image) at K 2016.

Absorber-free laser transmission welding

When laser welding thermoplastics, one of the components is usually transparent, and an absorber material is added to the second part to enable it to better absorb the laser radiation. The laser then passes through the first component and melts the second, thus joining the two parts.

The additive can be omitted if a longer-wavelength laser is used. Then both components absorb the radiation and care must be taken to ensure selective melting while minimizing the size of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The process required for this was developed at Fraunhofer ILT and involves rapidly (>1 m/s) and repeatedly guiding the laser beam along the welding contour while simultaneously discharging the heat above and below the parts being joined.

The method is expected to be of interest particularly in the field of medical engineering, where additives can pose a risk to biocompatibility. However, the method can also be used in other applications where absorbers are not permissible for reasons of appearance, cost or function.

Secure and gentle sealing of multilayer films

A similar laser can also be used to seal multilayer films against external media. This is useful, for example, when processing lithium batteries or OLED displays, which contain materials that are very sensitive to oxygen or water vapor. For this reason, they are encapsulated in special high-barrier multilayer films.

Normally the film is adhesively bonded or heat-sealed around the perimeter of the components to be protected, creating a pocket that includes, for instance, the flexible organic LED. Now, with a special laser, it is possible to selectively melt just one layer of the film, making the production-ready sealing process even gentler for the packaged component.

In addition to its suitability for electronics, this technology could also be of interest in the area of medical packaging that has to satisfy stricter requirements. Developed as part of a research project, this technology is currently still being refined. Future plans for it include encapsulation of flexible solar cells and use in roll-to-roll processing.

Fraunhofer ILT will have several specialists in the development of new laser-based technologies and processes representing the institute at the joint Fraunhofer booth at K 2016, Hall 7, Booth SC01.

Contact

Dr.-Ing. Alexander Olowinsky
Group Manager Micro Joining
Telephone +49 241 8906-491
alexander.olowinsky@ilt.fraunhofer.de

Dipl. Wirt.-Ing. Christoph Engelmann
Micro Joining Group
Telephone +49 241 8906-217
christoph.engelmann@ilt.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ilt.fraunhofer.de/en.html

Petra Nolis | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht OLEDs applied to paper-thin stainless steel
21.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht New VDI standards established for cleanroom technology
11.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>