Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

»Green Chemistry« ensures sustainable materials cycle

03.06.2015

This year biobased processes and procedures and bio-economy are in the focus of ACHEMA, which will take place in Frankurt from June 15 to 19, 2015. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC in Würzburg has set itself the goal of developing innovative materials and processes for environmentally friendly production and recycling. The Fraunhofer ISC shows recent examples of its work at the joint booth of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, booth D64, hall 9.2.

New multifunctional materials can save resources, costs, and energy while providing innovative applications. In addition to the use of environment-friendly materials, process-optimized, efficient production processes and the re-use of raw materials play equally important roles for a sustainable future. Materials, however, which cannot be re-used, should at least be biodegradable or recyclable.


With smartQCC – developed in the Center of Device Development CeDeD – you can easily measure volumetric laboratory glassware with a joystick.

Photo: K. Dobberke for Fraunhofer ISC

Re-use not consume resources

This is the motto of the Fraunhofer project group for material cycles and resource strategy IWKS headquartered in Alzenau/Hanau. The project group IWKS explores new recycling and substitution possibilities for rare and critical materials. Together with industry partners new technologies for the recovery and sorting of recyclable materials are being developed.

At ACHEMA, the project group IWKS presents latest developments in the field of biomaterials, which are in fact biowaste, but can serve different purposes as vegetable raw materials. One goal is to ensure that the acreage for renewable resources – often used as substitutes for petroleum-based materials – does not compete with the acreage for food. The use of biowaste materials from groceries and pharmaceutical industries could reduce costs and contributes to a more sustainable production, e.g. as base material in barrier layers for food packaging.

Self-recycling packaging

Researchers of the European project »DibbioPack« – short for »development of injection and blow extrusion molded biodegradable and multifunctional packages by nanotechnology« search for an alternative to commonly used petroleum-based plastic packaging. Within the project the Fraunhofer ISC developed novel biodegradable functional layers, so-called bioORMOCER®s that can be applied as a lacquer to films and other substrates. The bioORMOCER® barrier protects the contents from oxygen, water vapor, aromas or chemical substances, or in reverse doesn’t let them escape.

So far, the barrier effect of conventional biodegradable materials was not sufficient. The novel bioORMOCER®s from biopolymers such as cellulose and chitosan decompose after only six weeks in certain formulations. However, the degradation rate can be adjusted to desired packaging properties, depending on whether pharmaceuticals, cosmetics or foods are packed.

Smart process optimization – 100% quality control

Besides using ecologically harmless materials a sustainable production process is another important factor. SmartQCC – developed at the Center of Device Development CeDeD in Bronnbach Branch of Fraunhofer ISC – is suitable for the semi-automatic quality control of volumetric laboratory glassware such as pipettes and burettes. It enables easy and precise quality tests of measurement volumes by joystick. During the expo attendees are invited to give it a try at the booth of Fraunhofer ISC. Manual tests are complicated and give poorly reproducible results due to various sources of error. On the other hand, smartQCC offers high accuracy and repeatability with a precise detection of the markings and a direct printout of the measured values. Low maintenance and running costs complete the optimization of the manufacturing process of volumetric laboratory glassware.

Wastewater treatment with magnetic particles

Many fertilisers, heavy metals and other substances end up in sewage and are difficult to remove. A development of the Fraunhofer ISC and the project group IWKS offers a remedy. Small, advanced magnetic particles that are distributed to the wastewater, can chemically bind polluting or other substances. With a magnet the loaded particles can be pulled out of the water, and the bonded substances can then be separated. As the method works very selectively, even very low concentrations of materials can be recovered with high purity. Afterwards both the particles and the materials are available for further use. For his discovery Dr. Karl-Sebastian Mandel was awarded the prestigious German Students Award of the Körber Foundation.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.isc.fraunhofer.de
http://www.iwks.fraunhofer.de

Marie-Luise Righi | Fraunhofer-Institut für Silicatforschung ISC

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Solar Collectors from Ultra-High Performance Concrete Combine Energy Efficiency and Aesthetics
16.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

nachricht Energy-Efficient Building Operation: Monitoring Platform MONDAS Identifies Energy-Saving Potential
16.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Water - as the underlying driver of the Earth’s carbon cycle

17.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

17.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Smart homes will “LISTEN” to your voice

17.01.2017 | Architecture and Construction

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>