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Fraunhofer FEP at YUGAGRO 2015

17.11.2015

From 24 – 27th of November 2015 Fraunhofer FEP is exhibiting its innovative technology for seed treatment at YUGAGRO, Krasnodar, Russia.

European Directive (2009/128/EC) and German National Action Plan encourage the introduction of economic and technological instruments with reduced use of pesticides. In this context, Fraunhofer FEP is ready to offer its environmentally-friendly technology for electron-treatment of seeds.


Seed for the next season

Fraunhofer FEP

This method works effectively against all pathogens on the surface and into the seed shell ensuring lasting protection by interrupting the chain of infection and eliminating harmful microorganisms. The method was labelled by the Julius-Kühn-Institute (JKI) as an “alternative method to chemical dressing”. Currently, companies like Nordkorn Saaten GmbH are actively using this method for commercial seed processing.

Sustainable agricultural practices are gaining relevance around the world. Therefore, Fraunhofer FEP along with its partner, the company Axellance Group, is bringing “the method of electron-treatment of seeds” to Russia and is going to showcase it at the YUGAGRO International trade fair on 24-27th of November 2015 at the Pavillion 4, booth 146.

About Fraunhofer FEP

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP works on innovative solutions in the fields of vacuum coating, surface treatment as well as organic semiconductors. The core competences electron beam technology, sputtering and plasma-activated deposition, high-rate PECVD as well as technologies for the organic electronics and IC/system design provide a basis for these activities.

Thus, Fraunhofer FEP offers a wide range of possibilities for research, development and pilot production, especially for the processing, sterilization, structuring and refining of surfaces as well as OLED microdisplays, organic and inorganic sensors, optical filters and flexible OLED lighting.

Our aim is to seize the innovation potential of the electron beam, plasma technology and organic electronics for new production processes and devices and to make it available for our customers. COMEDD (Center for Organics, Materials and Electronic Devices Dresden) with all known activities in organic electronics is now acting as a new business unit at Fraunhofer FEP, Dresden, Germany.

About Axellance Group

Axellance Group develops and supplies technological solutions based on electron beam accelerators. Solutions provided sustainably works for different industries: medical products, foods, polymers, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals and other segments.

The scope of supply always includes feasibility study of the project, including cost efficiency calculations, technologies compatibility and optimal project schedule. Company’s mission is to provide client’s business with smart solutions to accelerate its development.

Press contact:

Mrs. Annett Arnold

Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP
Phone +49 351 2586 452 | annett.arnold@fep.fraunhofer.de
Winterbergstraße 28 | 01277 Dresden | Germany | www.fep.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://s.fhg.de/qA4

Annett Arnold | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

Further reports about: Beam Electron Beam Elektronik FEP OLED Organic Electronics Plasma Plasmatechnik

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