Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cebit 2017: CISPA Researchers Present Early Warning System for Mass Cyber Attacks

16.03.2017

Mass attacks from the Internet are a common fear: Millions of requests in a short time span overload online services, grinding them to a standstill for hours and bringing Internet companies to their knees. The operators of the site under attack can often only react by redirecting the wave of requests, or by countering it with an exceptionally powerful server. This has to happen very quickly, however. Researchers from the Competence Center for IT Security, CISPA, at the Saarland University have developed a kind of early warning system for this purpose. Details and first results will be presented by the scientists at the computer fair Cebit in Hannover.

These mass cyber attacks, known as “Distributed Denial of Service” (DDoS) attacks, are considered to be one of the scourges of the Internet. Because they are relatively easy to conduct, they are used by teenagers for digital power games, by criminals as a service for the cyber mafia, or by governments as a digital weapon.


At CISPA researchers are mapping mass cyber attacks in realtime

Universität des Saarlandes/CISPA

According to the software enterprise Kaspersky, some 80 countries were affected in the last quarter of 2016 alone, and counting. Last October, for example, several major online platforms such as Twitter, Netflix, Reddit and Spotify were unavailable to Internet users in North America, Germany, and Japan for several hours. A new type of DDoS attack, a so-called amplification attack, was found to be the source of these outages.

“What makes this so insidious is that the attackers achieve maximum damage with very little effort,” says Christian Rossow, professor for IT security at the Saarland University, and head of the System Security Group at the local IT Security Competence Center, CISPA. Remote-controlled computers are used to direct requests at vulnerable systems in such a way that the system’s responses far exceed the number of requests. The request addresses are then replaced by the Internet address of the victim. Rossow has identified 14 different Internet protocols that can be exploited for this kind of attack.

To investigate these malicious attacks, and the people and motives behind them more closely, Rossow has developed a special kind of digital bait for distributed attacks (also known as honeypots), in collaboration with the CISPA researchers Lukas Krämer and Johannes Krupp and with colleagues from Japan. 21 of these honeypot traps were laid out in the more obscure corners of the Internet, enabling the researchers to document more than 1.5 million attacks.

In this manner, he could identify the different phases of attacks which helped develop an early warning system from the data. He additionally attached secret digital markers to the attack codes he discovered in the digital wilderness, and was thus able to trace the source of the attacks. “This is quite impressive, because these address counterfeiters usually remain hidden by default,” says Rossow.

This is not the first time that Rossow has systematically infiltrated cyber-criminals’ networks. He also managed to take down the infamous botnet “Gameover Zeus” in a similar manner, on behalf of the US domestic intelligence service FBI. In the meantime, he has redesigned his bait to match the latest varieties of DDoS attacks. Cyber-criminals today no longer rely on vulnerable servers, but also attack networked televisions, webcams, or even refrigerators. The “Internet of Things” makes it possible.

Background: Competence Center for IT Security CISPA

CISPA was founded at the Saarland University as a competence center for IT security in October 2011, with the support of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It combines the IT security research of the Saarland University’s Computer Science department, as well as that of its on-campus partners, the Max Planck Institute for Computer Science, the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems, and the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, DFKI. Meanwhile CISPA has developed into an established research center for IT security with international appeal. Due to the excellent quality of its scientific publications and projects, CISPA is one of the leading research centers for IT security in the world today.

Additional Information:

Link to Paper “AmpPot: Monitoring and Defending Against Amplification DDoS Attacks”
http://christian-rossow.de/publications/iotpot-woot2015.pdf

Press photos can be found here free of charge www.uni-saarland.de/pressefotos

Further Inquiries:
Prof. Dr. Christian Rossow
Center for IT Security, Privacy and Accountability
Saarland Informatics Campus E9.1
Phone: +49 681 / 302-70797
E-Mail: rossow@cispa.saarland

Johannes Krupp
Center for IT-Security, Privacy and Accountability
Saarland Informatics Campus E9.1
Phone: +49 681 / 302-70805
E-Mail: johannes.krupp@cispa.saarland>

Editor:
Gordon Bolduan
Competence Center Computer Science Saarland
Phone: +49 681 302-70741
E-Mail: gbolduan@mmci.uni-saarland.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://christian-rossow.de/publications/iotpot-woot2015.pdf

Friederike Meyer zu Tittingdorf | Universität des Saarlandes

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Medica 2017: New software enables early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis
06.11.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

nachricht Support Free with “TwoCure” – Innovation in Resin-Based 3D Printing
02.11.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

17.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

17.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

17.11.2017 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>