Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Aachen Center for 3D Printing at RapidTech 2016: Additive Manufacturing for Medium-Size Companies

25.05.2016

Over the last several years, RapidTech in Erfurt has become a major venue for German users of 3D printing and additive manufacturing. The Aachen Center for 3D Printing is represented at Booth 925 in Hall 22, along with a double-decker bus from Aachen University of Applied Sciences, to offer exciting ideas for industrial users.

Nearly 4000 attendees from 15 countries were on hand for last year's RapidTech exhibition in Erfurt. This year, the organizers have significantly expanded the exhibition space while also extending the event by an additional day.


Image 1: The Aachen University of Applied Sciences’ FabBus features eight workstations for training and further education as well as twelve 3D printers.

© GoetheLab for Additive Manufacturing at Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Germany.


Image 2: Tool for foaming of polymers. Due to its complex structure, it is produced using Selective Laser Melting.

© Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

Through the FabCon 3.D and RapidTech exhibitions as well as the RapidTech specialist conference with 700 participants (2015), they are targeting not only industrial users of additive manufacturing but also startups and creatives in the 3D printing community.

Experts from the Aachen Center for 3D Printing, a joint project of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT and Aachen University of Applied Sciences, will again be on hand for the event.

The project partners aim to provide small and medium-sized enterprises with easy access to the entire additive manufacturing (AM) process chain. To this end, they are offering training and further education initiatives in addition to consultation, hands-on training and joint projects.

Trying Out Additive Manufacturing in the FabBus

Aachen University’s FabBus is a converted double-decker bus with eight training stations and twelve 3D printers on board. Located on the edge of Hall 2 next to the FabCon 3.D Forum, the FabBus is set to be quite an eye-catcher. The Aachen experts take the bus to customers, where employees from a wide range of manufacturing sectors can try out this technology. In addition to the training stations, the bus also features fully equipped design workstations and a variety of 3D printers for polymers.

This allows customers to observe and discuss all stages of additive manufacturing. From additive-friendly design to additive manufacturing, rework and quality analysis, the Aachen Center for 3D Printing offers its full range of expertise along the additive process chain. The center also offers programs for people to train as “Additive Manufacturing Designer” or “Additive Manufacturing Specialist.”

A Low-Cost SLM System for Medium-Size Companies

Aside from the training and further education of employees, capital investments in production systems represent the greatest barrier to entry in additive manufacturing. The FabBus has already succeeded in lowering these hurdles, yet the acquisition costs for production systems, particularly those for processing metallic materials, remain high.

And this is exactly the point of focus for a new project initiated by the Aachen Center for 3D Printing – the specialists are developing a 3D printer for metallic materials for under 10,000 euros!

At the conference

Cost structures also play an important role at the RapidTech specialist conference. On Tuesday, June 14, two experts from Aachen will be discussing “Machine-Specific Cost Drivers in Additive Manufacturing Using Laser Melting” (Johannes Schrage, Chair for Laser Technology LLT at RWTH Aachen University) as well as “Increasing Build-up Rates Using High-Power Selective Laser Melting for Ti6Al4V Material” (Maximilian Schniedenharn, Fraunhofer ILT).

With around 700 participants last year, the conference is one of the largest specialist events for additive processes in Europe. Split into a user convention and ten different expert forums, it provides participants with an overview of the current state of scientific research and offers user forums with topics ranging from “additive contract manufacturing” to “aviation”.

Contact

Prof. Andreas Gebhardt
Aachen Center for 3D Printing
Telephone +49 241 6009 52500
gebhardt@fh-aachen.de

Julia Kessler
Team Manager GoetheLab for Additive Manufacturing FH Aachen
Telephone +49 241 6009 52803
kessler@fh-aachen.de
Aachen University of Applied Sciences

Dipl.-Wirt.-Ing. Sebastian Bremen
Rapid Manufacturing Group
Telephone +49 241 8906-537
sebastian.bremen@ilt.fraunhofer.de

M.A. Dawid Ziebura
Rapid Manufacturing Group
Telephone +49 241 8906 – 8172
dawid.ziebura@ilt.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ilt.fraunhofer.de/en.html
http://s.fhg.de/CQt
http://www.fabbus.fh-aachen.de

Petra Nolis | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

Further reports about: 3D 3D Printing Applied Sciences ILT Lasertechnik Manufacturing Rapid Manufacturing

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht SYSTEMS INTEGRATION 2018 in Switzerland focuses on building blocks for industrial digitalization
20.11.2017 | IVAM Fachverband für Mikrotechnik

nachricht Medica 2017: New software enables early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis
06.11.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Corporate coworking as a driver of innovation

22.11.2017 | Business and Finance

PPPL scientists deliver new high-resolution diagnostic to national laser facility

22.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Quantum optics allows us to abandon expensive lasers in spectroscopy

22.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>