Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Aachen Center for 3D Printing at RapidTech 2016: Additive Manufacturing for Medium-Size Companies

25.05.2016

Over the last several years, RapidTech in Erfurt has become a major venue for German users of 3D printing and additive manufacturing. The Aachen Center for 3D Printing is represented at Booth 925 in Hall 22, along with a double-decker bus from Aachen University of Applied Sciences, to offer exciting ideas for industrial users.

Nearly 4000 attendees from 15 countries were on hand for last year's RapidTech exhibition in Erfurt. This year, the organizers have significantly expanded the exhibition space while also extending the event by an additional day.


Image 1: The Aachen University of Applied Sciences’ FabBus features eight workstations for training and further education as well as twelve 3D printers.

© GoetheLab for Additive Manufacturing at Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Germany.


Image 2: Tool for foaming of polymers. Due to its complex structure, it is produced using Selective Laser Melting.

© Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

Through the FabCon 3.D and RapidTech exhibitions as well as the RapidTech specialist conference with 700 participants (2015), they are targeting not only industrial users of additive manufacturing but also startups and creatives in the 3D printing community.

Experts from the Aachen Center for 3D Printing, a joint project of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT and Aachen University of Applied Sciences, will again be on hand for the event.

The project partners aim to provide small and medium-sized enterprises with easy access to the entire additive manufacturing (AM) process chain. To this end, they are offering training and further education initiatives in addition to consultation, hands-on training and joint projects.

Trying Out Additive Manufacturing in the FabBus

Aachen University’s FabBus is a converted double-decker bus with eight training stations and twelve 3D printers on board. Located on the edge of Hall 2 next to the FabCon 3.D Forum, the FabBus is set to be quite an eye-catcher. The Aachen experts take the bus to customers, where employees from a wide range of manufacturing sectors can try out this technology. In addition to the training stations, the bus also features fully equipped design workstations and a variety of 3D printers for polymers.

This allows customers to observe and discuss all stages of additive manufacturing. From additive-friendly design to additive manufacturing, rework and quality analysis, the Aachen Center for 3D Printing offers its full range of expertise along the additive process chain. The center also offers programs for people to train as “Additive Manufacturing Designer” or “Additive Manufacturing Specialist.”

A Low-Cost SLM System for Medium-Size Companies

Aside from the training and further education of employees, capital investments in production systems represent the greatest barrier to entry in additive manufacturing. The FabBus has already succeeded in lowering these hurdles, yet the acquisition costs for production systems, particularly those for processing metallic materials, remain high.

And this is exactly the point of focus for a new project initiated by the Aachen Center for 3D Printing – the specialists are developing a 3D printer for metallic materials for under 10,000 euros!

At the conference

Cost structures also play an important role at the RapidTech specialist conference. On Tuesday, June 14, two experts from Aachen will be discussing “Machine-Specific Cost Drivers in Additive Manufacturing Using Laser Melting” (Johannes Schrage, Chair for Laser Technology LLT at RWTH Aachen University) as well as “Increasing Build-up Rates Using High-Power Selective Laser Melting for Ti6Al4V Material” (Maximilian Schniedenharn, Fraunhofer ILT).

With around 700 participants last year, the conference is one of the largest specialist events for additive processes in Europe. Split into a user convention and ten different expert forums, it provides participants with an overview of the current state of scientific research and offers user forums with topics ranging from “additive contract manufacturing” to “aviation”.

Contact

Prof. Andreas Gebhardt
Aachen Center for 3D Printing
Telephone +49 241 6009 52500
gebhardt@fh-aachen.de

Julia Kessler
Team Manager GoetheLab for Additive Manufacturing FH Aachen
Telephone +49 241 6009 52803
kessler@fh-aachen.de
Aachen University of Applied Sciences

Dipl.-Wirt.-Ing. Sebastian Bremen
Rapid Manufacturing Group
Telephone +49 241 8906-537
sebastian.bremen@ilt.fraunhofer.de

M.A. Dawid Ziebura
Rapid Manufacturing Group
Telephone +49 241 8906 – 8172
dawid.ziebura@ilt.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ilt.fraunhofer.de/en.html
http://s.fhg.de/CQt
http://www.fabbus.fh-aachen.de

Petra Nolis | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

Further reports about: 3D 3D Printing Applied Sciences ILT Lasertechnik Manufacturing Rapid Manufacturing

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht OLEDs applied to paper-thin stainless steel
21.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht New VDI standards established for cleanroom technology
11.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>