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Distinguished for embracing equal opportunity


Fraunhofer IAO and the University of Stuttgart IAT receive “Total E-Quality” award: For the fifth time in a row, Fraunhofer IAO and its partner IAT of the University of Stuttgart received the Total E-Quality award for equal opportunity on October 24, 2014. With this title, Total E-Quality Deutschland e.V. honors companies and organizations that foster equal opportunities and practice sustainable personnel policies. The distinction is valid for three years.

High-quality services are possible only when all employees are on an equal footing. Fraunhofer IAO and its close partner the Institute for Human Factors and Technology Management IAT of the University of Stuttgart believe this is true for men and women, regardless of age, experience, cultural background or academic discipline.

Both institutes continuously develop new structures and frameworks that adapt to employees’ varying interests and use human resources policy tools to build awareness about equal opportunities among managers and employees alike.

The result is that, for the fifth time in a row, the two institutes have received the Total E-Quality award for their efforts. Total E-Quality Deutschland e. V., an association comprising representatives from politics, industry and science, bestows this award on companies that demonstrate commitment to equal opportunities for men and women and implement a successful and sustainable human resources policy.

In their official statement, the jury said that “to receive the award five times is clear proof of an intense dedication to creating equal opportunities. As examples of best practice, Fraunhofer IAO and IAT contribute positively to equal opportunity in our society.”

Equal opportunity officers Jasmin Link and Yvonne Wich accepted the honor on behalf of the IAO and IAT in Dortmund, Germany, on October 24. “The structures and measures in place at Fraunhofer IAO and at IAT create a good environment for equal opportunities. I hope that our employees take these ideas with them along with their research know-how, in keeping with Fraunhofer’s policy of transferring expertise through people. Also, as researchers, we are driven to constantly develop ourselves further – that’s why the institute is just the right place for innovations like these,” explains Jasmin Link.

Fraunhofer IAO and IAT of the University of Stuttgart have implemented numerous measures to promote equal standing for women and men, especially in regards to encouraging women’s careers and balancing work and family life.

These measures include mentoring and support programs, childcare near the workplace, a school holiday program for older children, flexible working times, and, for about a year now, a portable childcare unit that allows parents with small children to work in the office when primary childcare options are not available.

What’s more, Fraunhofer IAO participates in several research projects to develop equal opportunity measures at academic institutions. The STAGES project, for instance, will test structural changes related to equality in the sciences.

The Total E-Quality award is granted annually following a comprehensive application process and is valid for three years. A total of 57 organizations received the award this year, and the institute was honored for the fifth time in a row.

Jasmin Link
Beauftragte für Chancengleichheit
Fraunhofer IAO
Nobelstraße 12
70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Phone +49 711 970-5184

Weitere Informationen:

Juliane Segedi | Fraunhofer-Institut

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