Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Understanding how to teach “intelligence”

10.02.2015

More than ever, we need problem-solving skills to be able to adapt to our fast changing economies and societies. Researchers at the University of Luxembourg believe it is possible to teach these skills which are widely known as “intelligence”.

“Our research indicates that it should be possible to understand the complex psychological processes that enable people to solve problems, a construct that is more popularly understood as ‘intelligence’”, explains Romain Martin, Professor of Psychology and Empirical Educational Research at the University of Luxembourg.

“With this knowledge we could design programmes to train people to be adaptable throughout their lives,” adds Samuel Greiff, Professor of Educational Assessment at the University of Luxembourg. This analysis is detailed in a recently published paper compiled by the University of Luxembourg with input from an international group of academics.

At the basis of general problem solving is the ability to use strategies acquired in one area in a wide range of other tasks. Facts are widely available thanks to technology, but it requires particular skill to covert this diverse, plentiful information into useful knowledge.

It remains important to maintain traditional educational goals of teaching facts and different problem solving strategies, but new cross-curricular skills, indicating mental processes that are relevant in a number of situations and across several domains, are also needed.

University of Luxembourg researchers see strong evidence that this cross-curricular ability can be learned and is not simply a naturally acquired trait. The science is not yet sufficiently advanced to understand how the mechanisms work, for example how problem solving strategies can be employed to find a solution for different problems across domains. Fundamental research is required to deepen understanding and then this could be translated into practical programmes for action.

This work opens the possibility of revolutionising education. It could offer a path towards equipping all students for the knowledge economy, even those who are currently classified as being “non-academic”. The paper calls upon educators, governments, international bodies and researchers to work together to unlock the secrets behind how people learn to become intelligent.

“Domain-general problem solving skills and education in the 21st century”, Samuel Greiff et al is published in the journal Educational Research Review. doi:10.1016/j.edurev.2014.10.002

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni.lu

Sophie Kolb | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Assessment Psychology mechanisms mental processes

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht New Master’s programme: University of Kaiserslautern educates experts in quantum technology
15.03.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>