Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New process for cell transfection in high-throughput screening

21.03.2016

So far, the established methods for an efficient and cell-preserving transfection in high-throughput screening lead to unsatisfactory results. Within the scope of a project of the Industrial Joint Research (IFG), the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and its partners succeeded in developing a functional model for a gold nanoparticle-based laser transfection in high-throughput.

This transfection method is characterized by molecules entering the cells through an optically induced process. By attaching the gold nanoparticles to the cells, a photothermal effect is achieved under laser irradiation, which enables an efficient transfer of molecules into the cells.


Functional model for high-throughput screening.

Illustration: LZH


Selective manipulation of cells with fluorescent 10 kDa dextrans: The result of targeted laser irradiation using a laser mask can be seen under a microscope. Scale bars 10 mm

photo: LZH

Many advantages by changing the method

In comparison to the established methods for cell transfection, the risks and efforts can be considerably reduced by the gold nanoparticle process. The use of an optical mechanism also makes the method much more independent from the cell type and molecules used. Also, within larger samples, the transfection can be carried out both more precisely and cell-specifically.

Application tests and method comparisons for customers

Within the course of the project, a large amount of application data could already be collected, and application fields could be verified. The Biophotonic Imaging & Manipulation Group offers testing services for customer-specific methods and questions. Also, methods for cell transfection processes can be compared according to customer requirements.

Follow-up project with new partners

The project has been successfully completed by presenting a functional model. Now, the scientists are planning to continue their work. Methods for use in high-throughput testing shall be further developed and made ready for the market. Presently, the LZH is looking for partners from the screening area to build a prototype in the follow-up project.

The project “Setup and testing of a functional model for gold nanoparticle-based (GNOME) laser transfection in high throughput mode” is IGF project no. 18129 N of the Forschungsvereinigung Feinmechanik, Optik und Medizintechnik F.O.M. (Reseach Consortium Fine Mechanics, Optics and Medical Technology). It is supported via the German Federation of Industrial Research Associations "Otto von Guericke" e.V. (AiF) within the framewok of the Industrial Joint Research (IFG) of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The members of the advisory committee were: Center for Applied Nanotechnology (CAN) GmbH, Cenix BioScience GmbH, European ScreeningPort GmbH, IBA GmbH, LaVision BioTec GmbH and LLS Rowiak LaserLabSolutions GmbH.

Dr. Nadine Tinne | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Quick, Precise, but not Cold
17.05.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht A laser for divers
03.05.2017 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Self-disposing supramolecular materials with a tunable lifetime

19.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

Pause to read the traffic sign: regulation of DNA transcription in bacteria

19.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

19.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>