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Infrared Emitters Enable New Manufacturing Processes

11.05.2015

Infrared heat for sandwich structures

The manufacture of the latest sandwich structures, such as those used in modern aircraft and motor vehicles, requires various heating processes. An infrared heating system from Heraeus Noblelight offers the flexibility both for experimental series as well as for manufacturing.


Infrared emitters help to create sandwich components.

Copyright TU Dresden, Institut für Textilmaschinen und Textile Hochleistungswerkstofftechnik, ITM 2015

The Institute for Lightweight Construction and Plastics Technology (ILK) of the Technical University (TU), Dresden has used this to improve new combination processes, such as thermo pressing. The TU Institute has now transferred these innovative processes that they are now economically viable and will shortly be ready for production.

Foam technologies will be increasingly used in future as, combined with new joining technologies, they can improve the properties of many components and pave the way for new applications. Typical requirements in this new technology are the functionality and integration capability of components, while, at the same time, reducing component weight and manufacturing costs.

In thermo pressing, sheets of resin-impregnated composite sheets are joined with foam sheets. To do this, the sandwich made up of thermoplastic composite top and bottom layers and core material, is created in a press tool.

Heated semi-finished products are transported into a press tool, together with foam sheets, which are layered at top and bottom with the composite sections. On closing the tool, the covering layers and the foam core are brought together and formed under pressure into a sandwich structure.

Infrared systems transfer heat without the need for a contact medium, with the aid of electro-magnetic waves, which generate the heat directly in the material to be heated. Infrared systems offer very flexible adjustment and control of the output power.

At the same time, they feature very short response times, for short wave and carbon emitters, for example, this is a matter of one to three seconds. This means that heating is controllable and allows temperature profiling to be achieved. The flexibility of infrared systems makes them the ideal heat source in the conception phase of new technologies.

Heraeus, the technology group headquartered in Hanau, Germany, is a leading international family-owned company formed in 1851. With expertise, a focus on innovations, operational excellence and an entrepreneurial leadership, we strive to continuously improve our business performance.
We create high-quality solutions for our clients and strengthen their competitiveness in the long term by combining material expertise with technological know-how.

Our ideas are focused on themes such as the environment, energy, health, mobility and industrial applications. Our portfolio ranges from components to coordinated material systems which are used in a wide variety of industries, including the steel, electronics, chemical, automotive and telecommunications industries.

In the 2014 financial year, Heraeus generated product revenues of €3.4 bn and precious metal revenues of €12.2bn euros. With around 12,600 employees worldwide in more than 100 subsidiaries in 38 countries, Heraeus holds a leading position in its global markets.

Heraeus Noblelight GmbH with its headquarters in Hanau and with subsidiaries in the USA, Great Britain, France, China and Australia, is one of the technology- and market-leaders in the production of specialist light sources and systems. In 2014, Heraeus Noblelight had an annual turnover of 137.3 Million € and employed 884 people worldwide. The organization develops, manufactures and markets infrared and ultraviolet emitters, systems and solutions for applications in industrial manufacture, environmental protection, medicine and cosmetics, research, development and analytical measurement techniques.

For further information, please contact:
Technical: Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Reinhard-Heraeus-Ring 7
D-63801 Kleinostheim
Tel +49 6181/35-8545, Fax +49 6181/35-16 8545
E-Mail hng-infrared@heraeus.com

Press: Dr. Marie-Luise Bopp
Heraeus Noblelight GmbH,
Abteilung Marketing/Werbung
Tel +49 6181/35-8547, Fax +49 6181/35-16 8547
E-Mail marie-luise.bopp@heraeus.com

www.heraeus-noblelight.com

Dr. Marie-Luise Bopp | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

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