Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Applying electron beams to 3-D objects

23.09.2016

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP now has the technological means of applying electron beams very flexible to 3-D objects through use of its new electron wand of the Swiss company ebeam by COMET.

Electron beams are useful in many different applications. They reliably sterilize seed, can weld small structures precisely and reliable, and cure decorative paint. Usually this involves either planar, flexible, or slightly curved surfaces. However, applying electron beams homogeneously to 3-D objects of any size or shape has not been so simple up to now.


Electron exit window and robotic handling for applying electron beams over three dimensions

© Fraunhofer FEP, Photographer: Jürgen Lösel

Scientists at Fraunhofer FEP have now elegantly combined an electron wand with a six-axis robotic manipulator in order to be able to treat substrates with complex shapes as well as spherical objects, for example.

“The electron wand remains stationary in this process”, explains Javier Portillo, a scientist at Fraunhofer FEP. “The manipulator rotates the objects within the irradiation zone in a way, that the surface will be treated homogeneously. This creates the maximum degree of freedom when applying an electron beam to a 3-D-object.”

Normally you need several electron-beam sources to treat 3-D objects. Homogeneous application does not take place reliably everywhere in this process. The process of multiaxial moving the object within the electron treatment zone can hereby generate advantages. The application of electron beams to optical components is also conceivable.

These primarily involve hydrophilic surfaces found in a wide variety of applications, such as safety glasses with antifogging coatings, diffusing screens and lenses, and anti-condensation coatings for air conditioners and sensors in medical engineering.

Scientists can apply the new technology to develop customized processes for its industrial clients that meet specific demands – including being able to treat 3-D objects with various geometries – to suit even the most diverse existing production lines.

The symbiosis of an electron beam and robotic handling can make production processes more effective and economical.

Among other places, the new technology will be presented by Javier Portillo at the 12th Ionizing Radiation and Polymeric (IRAP) symposium taking place on the Giens Peninsula in France from September 25 – 30, 2016.

Talk

Electron Beam Curing of Acrylic Elastomers for Medical Products
September 26, 2016, 11:30 a.m., Session XIII: Surface Treatment
Presenter: Javier Portillo

PRESS CONTACT

M.Sc. Annett Arnold | Head of Corporate Communications | Fraunhofer FEP
Winterbergstr. 28 | 01277 Dresden, Germany | Phone +49 351 2586-452 |
Fax +49 351 2586-55452 | Email Annett.Arnold@fep.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://s.fhg.de/6xk

Annett Arnold | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP
Further information:
http://www.fep.fraunhofer.de/

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Quick, Precise, but not Cold
17.05.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht A laser for divers
03.05.2017 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>