Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Quantum diffraction at a breath of nothing

26.08.2015

Physicists build stable diffraction structure in atomically thin graphene

The quantum mechanical wave nature of matter is the basis for a number of modern technologies like high resolution electron microscopy, neutron-based studies on solid state materials or highly sensitive inertial sensors working with atoms. The research in the group around Prof. Markus Arndt at the University of Vienna is focused on how one can extend such technologies to large molecules and cluster.


Modern fabrication methods allow to make atomically thin nanomasks which prove to be sufficiently robust for experiments in molecular quantum optics.

Copyright: Quantennanophysik, Fakultät für Physik, Universität Wien; Bild-Design: Christian Knobloch

In order to demonstrate the quantum mechanical nature of a massive object it has to be delocalized first. This is achieved by virtue of Heisenberg's uncertainty relation: If molecules are emitted from a point-like source, they start to 'forget' their position after a while and delocalize.

If you place a grating into their way, they cannot know, not even in principle, through which slit they are flying. It is as if they traversed several slits at the same time. This results in a characteristic distribution of particles behind the grating, known as the diffraction or interference pattern. It can only be understood if we take the particles' quantum mechanical wave nature into account.

At the technological limit

In a European collaboration (NANOQUESTFIT) together with partners around Professor Ori Cheshnovsky at Tel Aviv University (where all nanomasks were written), as well as with support by groups in Jena (growth of biphenyl membranes, Prof. Turchanin), and Vienna (High-Resolution Electron Microscopy, Prof. Meyer) they now demonstrated for the first time that such gratings can be fabricated even from the thinnest conceivable membranes.

They milled transmission masks into ultra-thin membranes of silicon nitride, biphenyl molecules or carbon with a focussed ion beam and analysed them with ultra-high resolution electron microscopy. The team succeeded in fabricating stable and sufficiently large gratings even in atomically thin single layer graphene.

In previous quantum experiments of the same EU collaboration, the thickness of diffraction masks was already as thin as a hundredth of the diameter of a hair. However, even such structures were still too thick for the diffraction of molecules composed of dozens of atoms.

The same force that allows geckos to climb walls restricts the applicability of material gratings in quantum diffraction experiments: Molecules are attracted to the grating bars like the geckos' toes to the wall. However, once they stick to the surface they are lost to the experiment. A grand challenge was to reduce the material thickness and thus the attractive interactions of these masks down to the ultimate limit while retaining a mechanically stable structure.

"These are the thinnest possible diffraction masks for matter wave optics. And they do their job very well", says Christian Brand, the lead author of this publication. "Given the gratings' thickness of a millionth of a millimetre, the interaction time between the mask and the molecule is roughly a trillion times shorter than a second. We see that this is compatible with high contrast quantum interference".

A thought experiment of Bohr and Einstein

The bars of the nanogratings look resemble the strings of a miniature harp. One may therefore wonder whether the molecules induce vibrations in these strings when they are deflected to the left or the right during quantum diffraction. If this were the case the grating bars could reveal the molecular path through the grating and quantum interference should be destroyed. The experiment thus realizes a thought experiment that was discussed by Nils Bohr and Albert Einstein already decades ago:

They asked whether it is possible to know the path a quantum takes through a double slit while observing its wave nature. The solution to this riddle is again provided by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle: Although the molecules give the grating a little kick in the diffraction process this recoil remains always smaller than the quantum mechanical momentum uncertainty of the grating itself. It therefore remains undetectable. Here it is shown that this applies even to membranes that are only one atom thick.

###

Publication in "Nature Nanotechnology":

"An atomically thin matter-wave beamsplitter"; C. Brand, M. Sclafani, C. Knobloch, Y. Lilach, T. Juffmann, J. Kotakoski, C. Mangler, A. Winter, A. Turchanin, J. Meyer, O. Cheshnovsky, M. Arndt; Nature Nanotechnology (2015),

DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2015.179

The University of Vienna, founded in 1365, is one of the oldest and largest universities in Europe. About 9,500 employees, 6,700 of who are academic employees, work at 19 faculties and centres. This makes the University of Vienna Austria's largest research and education institution. About 92,000 national and international students are currently enrolled at the University of Vienna. With more than 180 degree programmes, the University offers the most diverse range of studies in Austria. The University of Vienna is also a major provider of continuing education. In 2015, the Alma Mater Rudolphina Vindobonensis celebrates its 650th Anniversary. http://www.univie.ac.at

Media Contact

Christian Brand
brandc6@univie.ac.at
43-142-775-1172

 @univienna

http://www.univie.ac.at/en/ 

Christian Brand | EurekAlert!

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Further Improvement of Qubit Lifetime for Quantum Computers
09.12.2016 | Forschungszentrum Jülich

nachricht Electron highway inside crystal
09.12.2016 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Electron highway inside crystal

Physicists of the University of Würzburg have made an astonishing discovery in a specific type of topological insulators. The effect is due to the structure of the materials used. The researchers have now published their work in the journal Science.

Topological insulators are currently the hot topic in physics according to the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Only a few weeks ago, their importance was...

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers identify potentially druggable mutant p53 proteins that promote cancer growth

09.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Scientists produce a new roadmap for guiding development & conservation in the Amazon

09.12.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Satellites, airport visibility readings shed light on troops' exposure to air pollution

09.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>