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Graphene microphone outperforms traditional nickel and offers ultrasonic reach

27.11.2015

Scientists have developed a graphene based microphone nearly 32 times more sensitive than microphones of standard nickel-based construction.

The researchers, based at the University of Belgrade, Serbia, created a vibrating membrane - the part of a condenser microphone which converts the sound to a current - from graphene, and were able to show up to 15 dB higher sensitivity compared to a commercial microphone, at frequencies up to 11 kHz.


Generic microphone on sound desk is shown.

Credit: Pixabay 2015 CC0

The results are published today, 27th November 2015, in the journal 2D Materials.

"We wanted to show that graphene, although a relatively new material, has potential for real world applications" explains Marko Spasenovic, an author of the paper. "Given its light weight, high mechanical strength and flexibility, graphene just begs to be used as an acoustic membrane material."

The graphene membrane, approximately 60 layers thick, was grown on a nickel foil using chemical vapour deposition, to ensure consistent quality across all the samples.

During membrane production, the nickel foil was etched away and the graphene membrane placed in the same housing as a commercial microphone for comparison. This showed a 15 dB higher sensitivity than the commercial microphone.

The researchers also simulated a 300-layer thick graphene membrane, which shows potential for performance far into the ultrasonic part of the spectrum.

"The microphone performed as well as we hoped it would" adds Spasenovic. "A thicker graphene membrane theoretically could be stretched further, enabling ultrasonic performance, but sadly we're just not quite there yet experimentally."

"At this stage there are several obstacles to making cheap graphene, so our microphone should be considered more a proof of concept" concludes Spasenovic. "The industry is working hard to improve graphene production - eventually this should mean we have better microphones at lower cost."

###

Contact

For further information, a full draft of the journal paper, or to talk with one of the researchers, contact IOP Senior Press Officer, Steve Pritchard: Tel: 0117 930 1032 E-mail: steve.pritchard@iop.org. For more information on how to use the embargoed material above, please refer to our embargo policy.

A copy of the paper can be found here: http://www.dropbox.com/sh/hofa7oxwdpainez/AACEpUStQe3h3pIuzV50pthJa?dl=0

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Multilayer graphene condenser microphone

The published version of the paper 'Multilayer graphene condenser microphone' (2D Mater. 2 045013) will be freely available online from Friday 27 November.

It will be available at http://iopscience.iop.org/2053-1583/2/4/045013.

2D Materials

2D Materials is a multidisciplinary, electronic-only journal devoted to publishing fundamental and applied research of the highest quality and impact covering all aspects of graphene and related two-dimensional materials.

IOP Publishing

IOP Publishing provides publications through which leading-edge scientific research is distributed worldwide.

IOP Publishing is central to the Institute of Physics, a not-for-profit society. Any financial surplus earned by IOP Publishing goes to support science through the activities of the Institute.

Go to ioppublishing.org or follow us @IOPPublishing.

The Institute of Physics

The Institute of Physics is a charitable organisation with a worldwide membership of more than 50,000, working together to advance physics education, research and application.

Media Contact

Steve Pritchard
steve.pritchard@iop.org
44-117-930-1032

 @IOPPublishing

http://ioppublishing.org/ 

Steve Pritchard | EurekAlert!

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