Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Clarifying the behaviors of negative hydrogen ions

12.12.2016

First measurement of the flow reversal of negative ions

The Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) is a method for increasing the plasma temperature and driving currents in magnetically-confined fusion plasmas by injecting neutral hydrogen/deuterium beams. As the plasma size increases, higher beam energy is necessary to deposit neutral beams at the core region of the confined plasma.


The current density reached 340 A/m2 at the maximum injection power. This value is comparable with the target of the ITER NBI.

Credit: Dr. Masashi Kisaki

The neutralization efficiency of positive hydrogen/deuterium ion beam accelerated with conventional NBI steeply decreases with energy of more than 100 keV. On the other hand, negative hydrogen/deuterium ion beams sustain the energy-independent neutralization efficiency of ~60 %. Consequently, negative-ion-based NBI are indispensable for recent large-scale plasma confinement devices. In order to construct negative-ion-based NBI with energy of 190 keV, NIFS researchers have successfully pioneered development of the negative ion sources.

Two significant improvements have been brought to the NIFS negative ion source. One is enhancement of the negative-ion current by optimizing the magnetic configuration for plasma confinement in the ion source. The second improvement is the development of an original beam accelerator equipped with the slot-aperture electrode, whose beam transparency is two times higher than the conventional circular-aperture electrode. Combining these two innovative ideas, the world's highest beam injection performance has been achieved with the beam power of 6.9 MW at the beam energy of 190 keV, as shown in Fig. 1.

Further investigation, however, is required to achieve higher performance and stability for advanced negative ion source to be adopted for future fusion devices. In addition, the ion-source size is too large for applying a trial-and-error approach. Scaling approach is not applicable either, because the mean free path of an electron is much shorter than the actual ion source for NBI and an ion source with the size smaller than the mean free path has different characteristics.

These conventional developments become difficult for achieving significant progress in performance. For this reason, the NIFS NBI group has initiated research that focuses upon the behavior of negative hydrogen ions inside the ion-source plasma.

In the case of the negative ion source, the small amount of cesium is injected into the ion source and the cesium-adsorbed surface of the so-called "plasma electrode" become activated to transfer the electron to hydrogen atoms and hydrogenous positive ions that are colliding on the surface. As shown in Fig. 2, these particles are converted to negative ions on the surface and are recoiled opposite to the beam direction. The mechanism of how the negative hydrogen ions change the direction of their velocity and are extracted as a beam has not been clarified.

Moreover, it also has not been clarified from which part of the surface of the plasma electrode the negative hydrogen ion is extracted as a beam. To this point, regarding the processes concerning the beam production through the extraction of negative hydrogen ions, although many simulations have been conducted, because numerous physical processes are related to this issue we still have not obtained results that will help explain the experimental results.

Research Results

In the large negative hydrogen ion source at NIFS, various types of diagnostics are available for measuring negative hydrogen ion density, electron density, and other quantities. These physics quantities can be measured spatially and temporally in detail. The behaviors of negative hydrogen ions can be clarified under the beam extraction. Heretofore, these behaviors had been difficult to measure experimentally.

Accompanying the beam extraction, the spatial flow distribution of the negative hydrogen ions was investigated by measuring the flow of negative hydrogen ions with the use of a compound-type electrostatic probe with four needle-type electrodes irradiated by laser pulse.

These operations were conducted at numerous places, and, during the beam extraction, we investigated how the flow of negative hydrogen ions changed. In the results of that investigation, it was clarified experimentally that the negative hydrogen ions generated at the plasma electrode move far from the electrode, subsequently make a U-turn, and flow toward the beam extraction hole where the beam extraction field is applied (See Figure 3). This feature of the negative ions has never been observed before this experiment. Clarifying the detailed configuration of the negative hydrogen ion flow is a valuable result for both physics and technology research.

This research result was reported at the 26th International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Fusion Energy Conference held in Kyoto, Japan from October 17-22, 2016. In addition to achieving success in improving the performance of the negative hydrogen ion source, we clarified experimentally detailed physical phenomena related to negative ion source plasma by using numerous diagnostics to investigate negative ion source plasma from numerous directions. These results were comprehensively evaluated, and received the NIBS Award at the 5th International Symposium on Negative Ions, Beams and Sources held in Oxford, England from September 12-16, 2016.

Significance of the Research

By applying the method developed in this research, measurement of the negative ion flow at places still closer to the plasma electrode is possible for clarifying more detailed mechanism of the negative ions extracted as a beam. The result provides a guideline to improve the performance of the negative ion source as well as an important contribution to the simulation field related to ion-source plasma. The negative ion beams are widely utilized not only in fusion research but also in medical applications, particle physics, and propulsion for spacecraft. The ripple effects of these experimental results and the newly developed diagnostic methods in this research are expected to contribute to these research developments.

Media Contact

Dr. Masashi Kisaki
kisaki.masashi@nifs.ac.jp
81-572-582-333

http://www.nins.jp/english/ 

Dr. Masashi Kisaki | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: Energy beam energy electrode hydrogen ions ion beams ions

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht NASA's James Webb Space Telescope completes final cryogenic testing
21.11.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Previous evidence of water on mars now identified as grainflows
21.11.2017 | US Geological Survey

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Previous evidence of water on mars now identified as grainflows

21.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope completes final cryogenic testing

21.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New catalyst controls activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond

21.11.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>