Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Women need not suffer after gynaecologic and obstetric surgery

12.11.2014

2nd international PAIN OUT symposium focusses on pain management in obstetric and gynaecologic surgery

On 17 November 2014, the 2nd international symposium of the PAIN OUT project (Improvement in postoperative PAIN OUTcome) will take place in Brussels. The project, which was funded within the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme, aims at improving management of postoperative pain. Coordination of this international research project with 17 partners from 9 different countries was carried out by researchers from Jena University Hospital.

This year’s thematic priorities will be expert discussion on pain management after gynaecologic surgery and caesarean section. Caesarean Delivery is one of the most painful surgical procedures. Pain therapist Winfried Meissner, coordinator of PAIN OUT and head of the Pain Management Unit at Jena University Hospital, points out: “Pain as well as its management affects not only millions of women but also their babies.” Hysterectomy is another frequent procedure which is associated with severe pain and negative effects on function.

World-leading pain specialist, gynaecologists and obstetricians will discuss results of the PAIN OUT data in this field, state-of-the-art treatment approaches, and consequences of insufficient pain management. A study describing a successful improvement strategy employed in the clinical routine will described. Other topics will highlight gender differences in pain experience, and a comparison of quality of pain management between the US and Europe.

Half of the women report severe pain after Cesarean delivery on the first day after surgery. In surgery as a whole, around 30 – 50 % of patients suffer from moderate to severe pain postoperatively. As approximately 15 million surgical procedures are carried out per year in Germany – and around 250 million across the world – the significance of postoperative pain is enormous, causes needless suffering, and drains societal resources. Acute pain after surgery can lead to postoperative complications, prolong the length of stay in hospital, and may result in pain becoming chronic.

About PAIN OUT http://pain-out.med.uni-jena.de

Main objective of PAIN OUT is to improve quality of postoperative pain management worldwide. The registry is fed with data on surgery, management and – above all – on the quality of pain treatment as well as on side effects assessed by the patients themselves (so called patient-reported outcomes). So far, the patient's perspective has rarely been taken into account in medical registries. The data provides clinicians and hospitals with feedback and benchmarking about the care provided in their own institution, over time, and in comparison with other hospitals. The data is also used to assess the efficiency of different therapeutic approaches in the clinical routine to answer scientific questions and allowing for healthcare research.

PAIN OUT is successfully continued after the end of EU funding. Together with its German counterpart QUIPS, more than 350,000 patient data have been collected. More than 200 sites in over 30 countries participate in both projects. This makes the project's database the largest international registry on postoperative pain.

The symposium is held in cooperation with the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), the German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Medicine (DGAI), and the German Pain Society.

PAIN OUT and QUIPS are coordinated by the Pain Management Unit at the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Jena University Hospital, directed by Prof. Winfried Meissner who also leads the Pain Management Unit. In addition to its scientific activities, the Pain Management Unit provides patient treatment, teaching of and education and training courses in pain medicine.

Registration for the PAIN OUT Symposium is still possible: http://pain-out.med.uni-jena.de/registration

For further information:

Claudia Weinmann
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine
Jena University Hospital
+49 3641 9 32 31 58
e-mail: claudia.weinmann[at]med.uni-jena.de

In case you are interested in interviewing experts and speakers, please contact us.


Weitere Informationen:

http://pain-out.med.uni-jena.de/sites/painout/files/Flyer_PAINOUTSymposiumBrusse

Dr. Uta von der Gönna | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

nachricht Disrupted fat breakdown in the brain makes mice dumb
19.05.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior

23.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>