Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UT-research: better outcome prediction of postanoxic coma

23.06.2015

EEG-measurements enable better prediction of the outcome of a coma that was caused by a lack of oxygen to the brain. This became clear from research of the University of Twente (MIRA) in cooperation with Rijnstate hospital and MST.

A new method helps to make reliable and correct estimates in about 50% of patients, instead of only 10% of patients with the methods currently used. This involves continuous EEG-measurements focussing on the speed with which the brain's activity recovers. It seems that recovery over time is a better indicator of the severity of brain damage than single brief measurements, which are currently done.

Half of the patients with a post-anoxic coma (a coma resulting from lack of oxygen to the brain) never regain consciousness. It is exceptionally difficult to reliably predict which patients are and which are not capable of recovering. Currently, prediction is based on clinical measurements of the depth of the coma in combination with a so-called SSEP measurement. This provides a correct estimate for only ten percent of patients. This is why doctor, and also family-members, need an instrument that is better at determining which patients do and which do not have a chance of recovery.

First 24 hours

Performing a continuous EEG measurement and looking at improvement of brain activity allows a correct estimate in half of the patients. This is shown by research of the University of Twente in cooperation with Rijnstate hospital and Medisch Spectrum Twente.

The published research, which involves data from approximately 300 patients, was carried out during the period from 2011 to 2014. This is the largest dataset ever used for research of EEG in postanoxic coma. According to the first author, dr. Jeannette Hofmeijer (assistant professor at the University of Twente and neurologist at Rijnstate hospital), who set up this research together with prof. dr. ir. Michel van Putten (chairholder Clinical Neurophysiology at the UT and neurologist/clinical neurophysiologist at the MST), EEG based outcome prediction showed less reliable results in previous studies. In the current study, prediction improved importantly by looking at the EEG differently.

Instead of using a single EEG measurement, EEG measurements were now made continuously. A single measurement provides insufficient reliable information about the severity of the brain damage and the chance of recovery. Otherwise, by looking at changes in brain activity over time, much more information can be obtained from the EEG.

Improvement of brain activity measured in the first 24 hours is crucial: if there is sufficient improvement within twelve hours, a good recovery can be predicted with a high level of probability, while the prognosis is invariably poor if there is insufficient improvement within 24 hours. Being able to determine the chance of recovery at an early stage provides doctors and families with better information about whether continuation of intensive care treatment makes sense.

Research
The research was initiated and set up by dr. Jeannette Hofmeijer and prof. dr. ir. Michel van Putten and carried out in cooperation with Tim Beernink (medical doctor at Rijnstate), dr. Frank Bosch (intensivist Rijnstate), dr. Albertus Beishuizen (intensivist MST) and dr. Marleen Tjepkema-Cloostermans (technical medicine UT and MST). The research was partly funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation, province Overijssel and Gelderland (ViP Brain Networks project). Marleen Tjepkema-Cloostermans obtained het PhD in the subject at the University of Twente in 2014.

Medical-ethical questions
This improvement in diagnostics is a step forward, but means doctors and family-members are faced with new important medical-ethical questions. Such as: when are the prospects of a coma-patient so poor that stopping treatment is justified? In a new study, doctors and philosophers at the UT's MIRA research institute will start searching for answers to these and other ethical questions. That study will start in the middle of this year and is being funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), the Netherlands Brain Foundation, Clinical Science Systems and Twente Medical Systems International.

Note for the press
For more information, interview requests, or a digital version of the article Early EEG contributes to multimodal outcome prediction of postanoxic coma, please contact the UT Science Information Officer, Joost Bruysters (06 1048 8228).

drs Joost Bruysters | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.utwente.nl/en/research/

Further reports about: EEG activity brain damage early stage ethical questions measurement

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht On track to heal leukaemia
18.01.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Penn vet research identifies new target for taming Ebola
12.01.2017 | University of Pennsylvania

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A big nano boost for solar cells

18.01.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Glass's off-kilter harmonies

18.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed

18.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>