Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Novel Therapy for Endometriosis?

28.09.2017

Why does endometriosis ameliorate during pregnancy? In the answer to this question, researchers from Inselspital in Bern, the HCERM fertility center in Rome and BioIncept in New York may have discovered a new treatment for endometriosis.

The chronic inflammatory condition endometriosis improves during pregnancy. Responsible for this anti-inflammatory action is a molecule (PreImplantation Factor: PIF), produced by the embryo.


PIF (green) modulates the inflammatory cells (red) in endometriosis (microscopic view)

Inselspital, Bern University Hospital

The same effect can be reproduced with a synthetic version of PIF, as a multidisciplinary group of researchers from Inselspital Bern, Rome and BioIncept New York were able to demonstrate on 13 September 2017 in PLOS One. The study results foreshadow the potential development of medication that can treat or even prevent endometriosis.

Tackling the root cause

“As PIF interacts with key regulators of immune processes, we can now influence the inflammatory reaction in endometriosis” explains corresponding author PD Dr. Dr. Martin Müller, Senior Attending in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Sciences at the Yale School of Medicine.

Lead author Marco Sbracia, who works in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Hungaria Center for Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine in Rome, adds: “Our findings suggest that PIF is involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis and might be used therapeutically as well as preventively.”

In this study Müller and the team discovered that PIF regulates cell death depending on the inflammatory milieu. Therefore, PIF has potential as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic option. “The results are exciting,” says Prof. Dr. Michael Mueller, Head of Gynaecology and Oncology at Inselspital Bern. “We want to further investigate this new approach to tackle the inflammatory processes at the root of endometriosis.”

A pregnancy molecule as treatment

PIF was first discovered and characterised by Dr. Eytan R. Barnea, the chief scientific officer of BioIncept, LLC. The FDA has awarded PIF fast-track designation, resulting in a recently completed first-in-human clinical trial to treat autoimmunity patients at the University of Miami. In Bern, the research team is now evaluating the possibility of a clinical trial for endometriosis. A potential application for the prevention of preterm delivery is also being evaluated.


It takes on average eight to ten years until endometriosis is diagnosed. Ten percent of women of childbearing age are affected by the progressive chronic disease. Besides strong pain during menstruation, the inflammatory adhesion may cause infertility. Still, many women put up with the disease as “normal menstrual complaints” until the pain is no longer bearable. “At this stage, minimally invasive surgery is often the best option to achieve freedom from symptoms,” says Michael Mueller, endometriosis specialist and Head of Gynaecology at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital.

The endometriosis center at Inselspital annually treats over 200 patients with a team of physicians and specialized endometriosis nurses. It has conducted research on the chronic disease for over fifteen years now. Currently, endometriosis is predominantly treated with hormone-active drugs or through surgery. The development of new drugs to stop the inflammatory processes without interfering with the woman’s hormone balance is therefore a major concern.

On the occasion of Endometriosis Day (29 September), the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Inselspital wants to sensitise the public to the still underestimated disease, especially underlining the importance of researching new therapeutic options.

Contact: PD Dr. Dr. med. Martin Müller, Senior Attending in the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Martin.Mueller@insel.ch.

Weitere Informationen:

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0184399

Monika Kugemann | Universitätsspital Bern
Further information:
http://www.insel.ch

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Minimising risks of transplants
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht FAU researchers demonstrate that an oxygen sensor in the body reduces inflammation
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stiffness matters

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Magnetic field traces gas and dust swirling around supermassive black hole

22.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

First evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

22.02.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>