Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mental health care access for teens improving, but less for communities with disparities

27.05.2015

A national survey shows perceived disparities in access to healthcare in communities with racial, ethnic inequities

Teens in the U.S. have more availability of mental health care than they did two years ago, according to a new survey from the University of Michigan National Voices Project, but access is not equal in all communities.


Teens in the US have more availability of mental health care than they did two years ago, according to a new survey from the University of Michigan National Voices Project, but access is not equal in all communities.

Credit: University of Michigan National Voices Project

The University of Michigan National Voices Project was commissioned by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to facilitate a five year study to gauge opportunities for children and teens at the local level in communities across the U.S. The National Voices Project surveys over 2,000 adults across the U.S. who work and/or volunteer on behalf of children and teens.

In a 2014 National Voices Project survey, 40 percent of adults said teens in their communities had lots of availability for mental health care. In a 2012 survey, only 30 percent of adults reported lots of availability. In comparison, 59 percent of adults in 2014 said that teens had lots of availability for primary care.

Adults' perceptions of healthcare availability were much different in communities where respondents perceived some or many racial/ethnic inequities. In these communities, just 35 percent of adults saw lots of availability for teens to get mental health care in 2014, up from 24 percent in 2012.

For the communities with few or no racial/ethnic inequities, 54 percent of adults perceived lots of availability for mental health care for teens, an improvement from 39 percent in 2012.

"Access to mental health care for teens remains a problem," says Matthew M. Davis, M.D., M.A.P.P., director of the National Voices Project and professor of pediatrics, internal medicine, public policy, and health management and policy at the University of Michigan.

"The good news is that adults are seeing improvements in access for teens in their communities in comparison with 2012. However, the bad news is that they are still seeing significant disparities in healthcare access for teens in communities where they perceive racial and ethnic inequities.

"Furthermore, mental health services are perceived as much less available than primary health care services for teens," says Davis, who is deputy director of the UM Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. "Given how common mental health concerns are among adolescents, improving access to behavioral services is as important as enhancing access to primary care."

Mental health services for children are also the subject of this month's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The Poll, also directed by Dr. Davis, surveyed parents across the U.S. and found that many were reluctant to discuss their children's behavioral and emotional concerns with their doctors. Both surveys, released during Mental Health Awareness Month in May, highlight the continued need to improve mental health care for young people in the U.S.

These data are part of the sixth survey from the National Voices Project, conducted in September-October 2014.

###

Full Report: http://nationalvoicesproject.org/healthcare-availability-2014

Full Size Infographic: http://nationalvoicesproject.org/sites/default/files/resources/infographic_healthcareavailability2014.png

Data Source: Data are based on responses from National Voices Project 2014 Survey, fielded September-October 2014. The National Voices Project is conducted in partnership with GfK, an international survey research organization that maintains KnowledgePanel®, a nationally representative web-enabled panel of adult members of households across the United States. Survey respondents included 2,147 adults from 50 states and D.C. that work or volunteer with children. 1,082 respondents have jobs that affect education, healthcare, economic opportunities, or community and civic engagement for children. Another 1,065 respondents volunteer in ways that affect education, healthcare, economic opportunities, or community and civic engagement for children.

About the National Voices Project:

The University of Michigan National Voices Project is an effort to bring the perspectives of thousands of people to the national dialogue about children. Children thrive on opportunity. But when opportunities differ because of children's race or ethnicity, where they live, or because of who they are, children face barriers in their health, education, and economic security and success. Measuring disparities for children is a key step toward addressing disadvantage. Careful measurement of sensitive issues can bring greater understanding. In turn, understanding informs new initiatives that can lead to meaningful changes for children. The National Voices Project is funded through the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as part of the America Healing initiative.

Connect with the National Voices Project:

Web: NationalVoicesProject.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nationalvoicesproject

Twitter: @NatlVoices

Findings from the National Voices Project do not represent the opinions of the investigators or the opinions of the University of Michigan.

Beata Mostafavi | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism
19.01.2018 | Weill Cornell Medicine

nachricht Researchers identify new way to unmask melanoma cells to the immune system
17.01.2018 | Duke University Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Optical Nanoscope Allows Imaging of Quantum Dots

Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. In particular, the new method allows the imaging of quantum dots in a semiconductor chip. Together with colleagues from the University of Bochum, scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute reported the findings in the journal Nature Photonics.

Microscopes allow us to see structures that are otherwise invisible to the human eye. However, conventional optical microscopes cannot be used to image...

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers reveal how microbes cope in phosphorus-deficient tropical soil

23.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Opening the cavity floodgates

23.01.2018 | Life Sciences

Siberian scientists suggested a new method for synthesizing a promising magnetic material

23.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>