Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lung cancer may be treatable with use of SapC-DOPS technology, research shows

10.02.2015

Lung cancer is the most common and the deadliest type of cancer worldwide, with about 221,000 new cases and an estimated 158,000 deaths in 2015 in the U.S., according to the American Cancer Society.

Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, followed by environmental and occupational exposure to pollutants.

A University of Cincinnati (UC) study, published in the advance online edition of the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, provides hope that the therapeutic agent SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of this cancer.

Xiaoyang Qi, PhD, associate director and associate professor in the Division of Hematology Oncology at the UC College of Medicine and a member of the Cincinnati Cancer Center, the UC Cancer and Neuroscience Institutes and the Brain Tumor Center, says these findings indicate that SapC-DOPS shows promise for treatment of one of the deadliest cancers globally. The findings also provide stronger evidence that this agent could be a key treatment for a variety of cancers.

"I partnered with scientists at Nanjing Medical University in China for this research, as lung cancer in China is a major health issue," Qi says. "As reported by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, more than half of lung cancer deaths caused by air pollutants worldwide occurred in China and other East Asian countries.

"Standard treatment options for lung cancer, including chemotherapy, radiation and surgery, have undesirable side effects that impact the quality of life of the cancer patient, which is why the targeted use of SapC-DOPS could be so beneficial."

SapC-DOPS consists of a lysosomal protein, saposin C (SapC), and a phospholipid named dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), which are combined and assembled into tiny cavities, or nanovesicles, to target and kill various forms of cancer cells.

Lysosomes are membrane-enclosed organelles that contain enzymes capable of breaking down all types of biological components; phospholipids are major components of all cell membranes and form lipid bilayers--or cell membranes.

Qi and collaborators have previously found that the combination of these two natural cellular components, called SapC-DOPS, caused cell death in many cancer cell types including brain, skin, prostate, blood, breast and pancreatic cancer, while sparing normal cells and tissues.

"Liposomal formulations as vehicles for drug delivery are the subject of intense research," he continues. "Compared with non-encapsulated, free drugs, they provide improved biocompatibility and targeted delivery. Despite promising results in preclinical models of lung cancer and many other cancer types, only a few non-targeted liposomal formulations have been approved for cancer treatment by regulatory agencies. Clinical trials are under way to evaluate some of these in lung cancer patients. However, so far, these liposomes have been shown to be less effective when compared with free drug administration, which is why the SapC-DOPS research is promising as a targeted treatment for lung cancer."

In this study, researchers used SapC-DOPS to selectively target the cell membrane of lung tumors in animal models and in human cell cultures.

Qi says a distinguishing feature of SapC-DOPS is its ability to bind to phosphatidylseriine (PS), a lipid, which is found on the membrane surfaces of all tumor cells.

"To evaluate the role of external cell PS, we evaluated PS exposure in human tumor and non-tumor cells in culture," he says. "We also introduced these cells into animal models and then injected the SapC-DOPS vesicles intravenously to see if we could halt tumor growth."

"Using a double-tracking method in live models, we showed that the nanovesicles were specifically targeted to the tumors. These data suggest that the acidic phospholipid PS is a biomarker for lung cancer, as it has been found to be for pancreatic and brain tumors in previous studies, and can be effectively targeted for therapy using cancer-selective SapC-DOPS nanovesicles."

"We observed that the nanovesicles selectively killed human lung cancer cells, and the noncancerous, or untransformed cells, remained unaffected," Qi continues. "This toxic effect correlated to the surface exposure level of PS on the tumor cells."

Importantly, animals treated with SapC-DOPS showed clear survival benefits and their tumors shrank or disappeared.

"Our results show that SapC-DOPS could be a promising treatment option for lung cancer worthy of further clinical study."

###

Other collaborators on this study include Shuli Zhao, Yunzhong Nie and Yayi Hou, all affiliated with Nanjing Medical University; Zhengtao Chu, UC and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; and Victor Blanco, UC.

This work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute (1R01CA158372), the New Drug State Key Project (009ZX09102-20) and the Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

The development and commercialization of this technology has been licensed to Bexion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, in which Qi, holds a minor (less than 5 percent) equity interest. The other authors declared no conflict of interest.

Media Contact

Katie Pence
katie.pence@uc.edu
513-558-4561

 @UCHealthNews

http://www.healthnews.uc.edu 

Katie Pence | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Vanishing capillaries
23.03.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht How prenatal maternal infections may affect genetic factors in Autism spectrum disorder
22.03.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Steep rise of the Bernese Alps

24.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

How cheetahs stay fit and healthy

24.03.2017 | Life Sciences

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>