Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Inselspital: Images from the depths of the brain

25.02.2016

The Neuroradiology Department of Bern University Hospital has managed to make the pathological electrical activity within the brain visible by means of an innovative procedure. This is improving the diagnostics of epilepsy patients.

For over 20 years, doctors have been dreaming of depicting the brain’s electrical activity in an MRI scan. Researchers from Bern University Hospital have now succeeded in making this dream a reality by means of a unique method.


The new method can do what the surface EEG cannot: show electrical activities in the brain.

Inselspital, Bern University Hospital


Example of an epilepsy patient before and after the successful operation.

©Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Bern University Hospital

The electrical fields are measured indirectly through their effect on magnetic fields,rather than directly. But although a healthy brain’s electrical fields are too weak to produce a measurable disruption of the magnetic field, neuroradiologists can now measure this where the fields are more pronounced in the short term. In patients with epilepsy.

Imaging helps to localise epilepsy and shows healing

The research team of physicist Dr Claus Kiefer and doctors Eugenio Abela, Kaspar Schindler and Roland Wiest from the Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging (SCAN) at the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology and the Department of Neurology at Bern University Hospital used the new method in a pilot study with eight epilepsy patients.

In doing so, it was found that the newly developed MR sequence makes magnetic field disturbances visible, even in deep regions of the brain. The surface EEG, which is otherwise used, has never achieved this. As a result, it is possible to localise the origin of the epileptic seizures with even more precision, which benefits those patients who exhibit no structural abnormalities in the “normal” MRI.

In addition, researchers demonstrated that epilepsy patients, who are seizure-free after an operation, no longer show such magnetic field disturbances – that their brain works “disruption-free” like that of a healthy person. On the other hand, patients who continued to have seizures still demonstrated the typical pathological signals. These astounding new insights into the function of our brain were published on 29th January in the renowned American journal, Radiology.

Patented methods only in Bern

The revolutionary imaging method is patented by the University of Bern and is only currently offered at Bern University Hospital. The advantage: If epilepsy patients, whose medication is not helping, need an MRI examination, just eight additional minutes in the MRI can better localise the region of origin of the exaggerated electrical brain activity. This is also the case if patients are not currently having a seizure, as the method is so sensitive that it even records weak epileptic activity that exists between the actual seizures.

The newly developed MR sequence is now expected to be validated internationally in further clinical studies.

Contact:
Prof Dr Roland Wiest, Chief Physician, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Bern University Hospital, +41 31 632 36 73.
Prof Dr Kaspar Schindler, Chief Physician, Department of Neurology, Bern University Hospital, +41 31 632 30 54.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26824710
http://www.neurorad.insel.ch/

Monika Kugemann | Universitätsspital Bern

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Flexible sensors can detect movement in GI tract
11.10.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbes

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open waters

17.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>