Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Discovery points to a new path toward a universal flu vaccine

03.07.2015

By taking advantage of a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system, researchers think they may be able to improve the vaccine

Flu vaccines can be something of a shot in the dark. Not only must they be given yearly, there's no guarantee the strains against which they protect will be the ones circulating once the season arrives.


Antibodies bind to a flu virus protein (grey) with their variable regions (blue) forming an immune complex. The antibodies' Fc region (red) will bind to immune cells. Researchers think flu vaccines could be improved by including immune complexes that contain antibodies with modified Fc regions.

Credit: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology at The Rockefeller University

New research by Rockefeller University scientists and their colleagues suggests it may be possible to harness a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system to create more effective and efficient vaccines against this ever-mutating virus.

"While the conventional flu vaccine protects only against specific strains, usually three of them, our experiments show that by including modified antibodies within the vaccine it may be possible to elicit broad protection against many strains simultaneously," says senior study author Jeffrey Ravetch, Theresa and Eugene M. Lang Professor and head of the Leonard Wagner Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology. "We believe these results may represent a preliminary step toward a universal flu vaccine, one that is effective against a broad range of the flu viruses."

In a paper published July 2 in Cell, the team describes a new strategy that revolves around antibodies, immune proteins that target specific foreign proteins, called antigens. One end of the antibody latches on to an antigen, the other end, called the Fc region, binds to immune cells and so helps coordinate the immune response.

It was already known that chemical modifications to antibodies' Fc region altered their interactions with immune cells, including B cells, which produce antibodies. In experiments that began with human volunteers, the team, led by Taia Wang, an instructor in clinical investigation, and Jad Maamary, a postdoc, both in Ravetch's lab, investigated how changes to this region might be used to bolster an immune response: namely the production of more potent antibodies against the flu virus.

Every year in the United States, influenza is implicated in the deaths of thousands of people, mostly 65 and older, and causes serious disease in many others. The virus makes for a difficult target for vaccines because its strains are so diverse, and new ones are constantly emerging. Types A and B cause seasonal flu epidemics. Influenza A viruses are further broken down into subtypes based in part on their surface proteins, which include hemagglutinin, the "H" in H1N1, for example. The subtypes are further divided into strains.

Currently, most flu vaccines in the United States are formulated to target a total of three or four viral strains: H1 and H3 influenza A viruses, plus influenza B virus strains. The strains are selected based on public health experts' predictions for the coming flu season. But sometimes they are wrong, rendering the shots ineffective. A universal flu vaccine has become something of a holy grail, and a number of strategies have been proposed to create it. Work in the Ravetch lab suggests a new alternative: chemical modifications to the Fc region of antibodies. These regions go on form complexes with vaccine antigens, which then modulate the evolving vaccine response.

First, the researchers vaccinated healthy volunteers with a seasonal flu vaccine containing an inactivated strain of the H1N1 virus. They then tracked the volunteers' immune responses via blood samples, keeping an eye out for chemical modifications to antibodies against the hemagglutinin protein.

About seven days after the vaccination, they saw a spike in sialylated antibodies, meaning sialic acid, an important signaling molecule, had been added at a specific spot on the Fc region. The greater the sialylation, the better a person's response to the vaccine.

To tease apart how this chemical modification improves the immune response, the researchers used cell cultures and mice to study the effects of sialylated Fc regions binding to B cells. Their experiments revealed a complex interaction that ultimately pushes the B cells to produce antibodies with a higher affinity to their antigens. It begins when a sialylated Fc region binds to a receptor protein known as CD23 on the B cells, prompting CD23 to activate a second receptor, FcγRIIB, which, in turn, discourages B cells producing low affinity antibodies. In this way, the sialylation on Fc regions establishes a high threshold for the immune response, so that only B cells producing the highest affinity antibodies are activated. The result of the higher affinity was broad protection against H1 subtype influenza viruses.

The researchers then used this knowledge to improve the vaccine itself. They modified the H1N1 vaccine so it contained not only protein from the virus itself, but also sialylated antibodies against that protein.

"When we immunized mice with just the H1 protein from one strain or with the sialylated complexes containing the same viral protein, we found both offered equal protection against the same strain of flu. However, when we exposed them to strains expressing different versions of the H1 protein, only the sialylated immunizations offered protection," Maamary says. "This was no small accomplishment, because H1 viruses can vary significantly from one another."

"The new mechanism we have uncovered, by which a vaccine containing sialylated antibodies elicits broadly protective antibodies, could potentially be harnessed to reduce the tremendous morbidity and mortality caused by seasonal influenza virus infections," Wang says. "We are now looking into applying this strategy toward improving existing vaccines; ideally, this would result in a vaccine that provides life long immunity against flu infections."

Wynne Parry | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis
23.01.2017 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Team discovers how bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armor
20.01.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>