Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Blood clots aggravate brain injuries

13.04.2016

When the brain is injured in an accident, the damage continues to spread in the following days. Blood clots are obviously to blame for this as a research team of the University of Würzburg has found.

Causes include falls during sports accidents or vehicle accidents: Traumatic brain injury is the most common cause of death and permanent disability in teenagers and young adults. In survivors, the brain damages usually worsen directly after the accident. So far, there are no therapeutic options available to prevent this development.


Patients with traumatic brain injury often have clotted blood vessels (arrow) that can aggravate brain damage. In healthy persons, the vessels are usually free of such deposits (asterisk).

Pictures: Neurological Hospital, University of Würzburg

A possible solution is described by Würzburg scientists under the leadership of Professors Anna-Leena Sirén (experimental neurosurgery) and Christoph Kleinschnitz (neurology) in the magazine "Annals of Neurology": According to the researchers, inhibition of blood coagulation factor XII might stop the brain damage from progressing further.

Tissue samples provided the decisive cue

How did the researchers come to this conclusion? "We investigated tissue samples of patients with traumatic brain injury provided by Uppsala University with which we cooperate in the European research association CnsAflame," Sirén explains. It turned out that blood clots in the patients' brains clog blood vessels with particular frequency.

The research team believed that this is the reason why the brain damage spreads. They studied the mechanism in mice whose blood does not coagulate because the factor XII is missing. "Clogged blood vessels and post-traumatic subsequent damage were reduced significantly here," biologist Dr. Christiane Albert-Weißenberger explains. Suppressing the blood coagulation using rHA-Infestin-4, a factor XII inhibitor from CSL Behring GmbH (Marburg), also had a protective effect.

What is more: "We did not observe any bleeding when using the inhibitor. This is crucial for the drug's safe application," explains pharmacist Sarah Hopp-Krämer, who wrote her doctoral thesis on this topic in the working group of Christoph Kleinschnitz. Bleeding is a frequent complication in traumatic brain injury. Therefore, therapeutic drugs must not under any circumstances trigger bleeding.

Still a long way to clinical application

The team's conclusion: The new findings are an important step towards developing new therapies for patients suffering from craniocerebral injuries. "The patients' tissue samples have provided valuable information in this regard," Kleinschnitz further. But he predicts that several more years will pass until accident victims can potentially benefit from the new knowledge, because further tests have to be conducted to study the long-term effect of the inhibitor rHA-Infestin-4, among others. The scientists hope to continue their long-standing collaboration with the Marburg-based company for this purpose.

Sponsors of the research project

The research project was financed by the EU-funded CnsAflame research association through the Else-Kröner-Fresenius Foundation, CSL Behring GmbH and the University of Würzburg's Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research.

“Targeting Coagulation Factor XII as a Novel Therapeutic Option in Brain Trauma“, Sarah Hopp, Christiane Albert-Weissenberger, Stine Mencl, Michael Bieber, Michael K. Schuhmann, Christian Stetter, Bernhard Nieswandt, Peter M. Schmidt, Camelia-Maria Monoranu, Irina Alafuzoff, Niklas Marklund, Marc W. Nolte, Anna-Leena Sirén, and Christoph Kleinschnitz, Annals of Neurology, DOI: 10.1002/ana.24655

Contact

Prof. Dr. Anna-Leena Sirén, Department of Neurology of the Würzburg University Hospital, Phone +49 931 201-24579, siren.a@nch.uni-wuerzburg.de

Prof. Dr. Christoph Kleinschnitz, Department of Neurology of the Würzburg University Hospital, Phone: +49 931 201-23755, christoph.kleinschnitz@uni-wuerzburg.de

Robert Emmerich | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg
Further information:
http://www.uni-wuerzburg.de

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Nanoparticles as a Solution against Antibiotic Resistance?
15.12.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>