Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Printing implants with the laser

21.07.2015

Whether for individual micro-implants or for micro-implants with medicine depots – additive processes are ideally suited for manufacturing such components. In the project “REMEDIS”, scientists at the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) have established a highly automated laser melting process to produce or coat implants made of platinum, nickel-titanium (NiTi) or stainless steel.

For this, scientists of the Surface Technology Group used a special form of 3-D printing – selective laser micro-melting (SLµM).


Three-dimensional structures made of the form memory alloy nickel-titanium using laser additive processes.

Photo: LZH

They were able to coat electrodes for pacemakers with platinum, and produce three-dimensional lattice structures made of NiTi as well as stent prototypes made of stainless steel. Within this project platinum has been – for the first time successfully – processed within micro scale.

Coated pacemaker electrodes

One way to lengthen the life of pacemakers is to intelligently adapt the form and surface of the electrodes. Platinum has excellent electrical conductivity characteristics, and it is bioinert. However, the metal has casting limitations, and it is hard to be worked on in the micro-range using conventional methods.

In the framework of this project, the scientists have developed an SLµM process for a platinum-iridium-alloy, and successfully coated implants.

Lattice structures made of shape memory alloys

The shape memory alloy NiTi is already widely used in medical technology. Micro-implants made of NiTi offer new possibilities for making tailor-made stents, or bone replacements for patients.

The scientists at the LZH have been able to successfully manufacture highly-complex, three-dimensional component structures made of NiTi. A resolution of up to 90 µm has already been reached for components, retaining all of the characteristics of the shape memory alloy.

Stent structures made of stainless steel

The use of stainless steel 316 L for SLµM processes has already been established. Within this project, stent structures with a closed cell design have been developed and produced. Their mechanical characteristics are similar to those of conventional stents.

The project was carried out together with the Institute for Biomedical Technology of the University of Rostock, as a subproject in the cooperative project “REMEDIS”. REMEDIS was supported by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF).

Weitere Informationen:

http://remedis.med.uni-rostock.de/

Lena Bennefeld | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.
Further information:
http://www.lzh.de/

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology
22.09.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Skin patch dissolves 'love handles' in mice
18.09.2017 | Columbia University Medical Center

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LaserTAB: More efficient and precise contacts thanks to human-robot collaboration

At the productronica trade fair in Munich this November, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be presenting Laser-Based Tape-Automated Bonding, LaserTAB for short. The experts from Aachen will be demonstrating how new battery cells and power electronics can be micro-welded more efficiently and precisely than ever before thanks to new optics and robot support.

Fraunhofer ILT from Aachen relies on a clever combination of robotics and a laser scanner with new optics as well as process monitoring, which it has developed...

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fraunhofer ISE Pushes World Record for Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells to 22.3 Percent

25.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Usher syndrome: Gene therapy restores hearing and balance

25.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

An international team of physicists a coherent amplification effect in laser excited dielectrics

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>