Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

MRI - prostate cancer screening for the future?

13.05.2015

A screening method that combines a traditional PSA test with an MRI detects a significantly greater number of prostate cancer cases and improves diagnostic accuracy. The study was conducted as part of the largest international research project on prostate cancer. The method will now be tried with 40,000 subjects in Gothenburg.

Prostate cancer, which is the third most common malignancy among European men, caused more than 92,000 deaths in 2012 alone.


Anna Grenabo-Bergdahl, Researcher, University of Gothenburg

University of Gothenburg

Sweden and many other countries use the PSA test for diagnostic purposes. The test has been widely criticized for yielding false negatives, as well as false positives that lead to needless assessment and treatment.

As a result, Swedish authorities have not issued a general recommendation for PSA screening.

Improve detection
As part of a large European research project, scientists at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, have studied a method that combines the PSA test with an MRI. Based on 384 Swedish subjects and presented in a doctoral thesis, the study concludes that the method can improve detection of more aggressive forms of prostate cancer.

"Additional research is required to confirm our findings, but the pilot study indicates that combining a PSA test with an MRI reduces the need for follow-up biopsies," says Anna Grenabo-Bergdahl, co-director of the study along with Professor Jonas Hugosson. "Depending on the PSA cut-off used, we can improve detection of potentially aggressive cancer while bypassing low-risk tumors that are generally of no clinical significance."

More precise biopsy
An MRI also facilitates identification of a possible malignant area such that any follow-up biopsy will be much more precise.

"That way the patient experiences less stress and clinicians are not as prone to overlook high-risk tumors," Dr. Grenabo-Bergdahl says.

The Swedish pilot study won the award for the best abstract by a resident at the Madrid conference of the European Association of Urology in late March.

Study on 40,000 subjects
The upcoming study will involve 40,000 subjects in the Gothenburg area.

"A repetition of the findings of the pilot study may be the opening shot of a paradigm shift in screening and early detection of prostate cancer," Dr. Grenabo-Bergdahl says.

Burden of unnecessary costs
The evidence is not in yet as to whether MRI is a cost-effective option for routine screening.

"Such an estimate must consider the costs associated with overdiagnosis under the current system," Dr. Grenabo-Bergdahl says. "Many men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer on the basis of a PSA test are old enough that low-risk tumors will never pose any kind of danger to their health. Not only does the healthcare system bear the burden of unnecessary costs, but the patient's quality of life is compromised by worry and risky treatment. If the use of MRIs can help minimize such incidents while detecting more potentially aggressive tumors, it will represent genuine progress on all scores".

Dr. Grenabo-Bergdahl defended Characteristics of screen-failures in prostate cancer screening on April 17.

Link to the thesis: https://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/38003

Contact:
Anna Grenabo-Bergdahl, Researcher, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg
anna.grenabo@vgregion.se


Weitere Informationen:

http://sahlgrenska.gu.se/english/research/news-article/mri---prostate-cancer-scr...

Henrik Axlid | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht 3-D visualization of the pancreas -- new tool in diabetes research
15.03.2017 | Umea University

nachricht New PET radiotracer identifies inflammation in life-threatening atherosclerosis
02.03.2017 | Society of Nuclear Medicine

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating stars

22.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>