Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fraunhofer ITEM takes over and continues development of inhalation technology assets from Takeda

10.02.2016

The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, on behalf of the Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine ITEM, has signed an asset transfer agreement with Takeda GmbH to exclusively transfer its Surfactant and Continuous Powder Aerosolization (CPA) program assets to Fraunhofer ITEM.

The transfer includes the CPA technology for continuous aerosolization of powdery substances and the know-how to manufacture recombinant surfactant protein C, together with the associated intellectual property. The Fraunhofer ITEM is thus in a position to continue the development of therapies involving continuous inhalation various medications, begun 10 years ago.


Closing down its respiratory department, Takeda transferred its Surfactant and CPA program assets to Fraunhofer ITEM including the associated intellectual property. The CPA technology is the first non-invasive administration method for powdery surfactant drugs.

Surfactant drugs have to be administered to patients with surfactant deficiency, which is common, for example, in preterm in neonates. Furthermore, this therapeutic approach has been investigated in other acute and chronic life-threatening diseases such as acute lung injury and COPD.

Surfactant (“surface-active agent“) is secreted by certain lung cells und reduces surface tension in the alveoli, thereby preventing their collapse. Physical activity causes an increase, smoking a decrease in surfactant production. Fetal surfactant production starts in week 24 of gestation. Preterm neonates, in particular if born before week 34 of gestation, suffer from varying degrees of pulmonary surfactant deficiency, which may lead to neonate respiratory distress syndrome.

Surfactant-based therapy is the standard of care. Its use is limited, however, due to the currently invasive administration methodology. The CPA technology simplifies surfactant delivery to neonates and can also be used for children and adults. Recombinant surfactant protein C is the first recombinant surfactant protein suitable for use in synthetic surfactant drugs.

CPA is also a suitable technology to continuously deliver pulmonary high doses of non-soluble drugs to patients. In respiratory care, the standard of aerosolization for continuous inhalation is currently confined to different classes of nebulizers. In contrast, the CPA technology for the first time enables continuous inhaled administration of non-soluble drugs. In addition, it delivers a higher drug concentration to patients and enables a higher lung deposition rate.

Dr. Gerhard Pohlmann, Head of Medical Inhalation Technology at Fraunhofer ITEM with a 10+ year track record in CPA technology development, said: “As a long-standing partner in the CPA program, Fraunhofer ITEM is delighted to continue development of the surfactant and CPA technology platform. We are currently in the strategic process of reorganizing the program and selecting development partners.”

Contact
Fraunhofer ITEM
Dr. Gerhard Pohlmann; +49 511 5350-116
gerhard.pohlmann@item.fraunhofer.de

Press contact
Fraunhofer ITEM
Dr. Cathrin Nastevska; +49 511 5350-225
cathrin.nastevska@item.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

The text of this press release can be found on our homepage at
http://www.item.fraunhofer.de/en/press-media/latest-news/pm-CPA-takeda.html

Dr. Cathrin Nastevska | Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized
23.05.2017 | Waseda University

nachricht Computer accurately identifies and delineates breast cancers on digital tissue slides
11.05.2017 | Case Western Reserve University

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>