Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fraunhofer ITEM takes over and continues development of inhalation technology assets from Takeda

10.02.2016

The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, on behalf of the Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine ITEM, has signed an asset transfer agreement with Takeda GmbH to exclusively transfer its Surfactant and Continuous Powder Aerosolization (CPA) program assets to Fraunhofer ITEM.

The transfer includes the CPA technology for continuous aerosolization of powdery substances and the know-how to manufacture recombinant surfactant protein C, together with the associated intellectual property. The Fraunhofer ITEM is thus in a position to continue the development of therapies involving continuous inhalation various medications, begun 10 years ago.


Closing down its respiratory department, Takeda transferred its Surfactant and CPA program assets to Fraunhofer ITEM including the associated intellectual property. The CPA technology is the first non-invasive administration method for powdery surfactant drugs.

Surfactant drugs have to be administered to patients with surfactant deficiency, which is common, for example, in preterm in neonates. Furthermore, this therapeutic approach has been investigated in other acute and chronic life-threatening diseases such as acute lung injury and COPD.

Surfactant (“surface-active agent“) is secreted by certain lung cells und reduces surface tension in the alveoli, thereby preventing their collapse. Physical activity causes an increase, smoking a decrease in surfactant production. Fetal surfactant production starts in week 24 of gestation. Preterm neonates, in particular if born before week 34 of gestation, suffer from varying degrees of pulmonary surfactant deficiency, which may lead to neonate respiratory distress syndrome.

Surfactant-based therapy is the standard of care. Its use is limited, however, due to the currently invasive administration methodology. The CPA technology simplifies surfactant delivery to neonates and can also be used for children and adults. Recombinant surfactant protein C is the first recombinant surfactant protein suitable for use in synthetic surfactant drugs.

CPA is also a suitable technology to continuously deliver pulmonary high doses of non-soluble drugs to patients. In respiratory care, the standard of aerosolization for continuous inhalation is currently confined to different classes of nebulizers. In contrast, the CPA technology for the first time enables continuous inhaled administration of non-soluble drugs. In addition, it delivers a higher drug concentration to patients and enables a higher lung deposition rate.

Dr. Gerhard Pohlmann, Head of Medical Inhalation Technology at Fraunhofer ITEM with a 10+ year track record in CPA technology development, said: “As a long-standing partner in the CPA program, Fraunhofer ITEM is delighted to continue development of the surfactant and CPA technology platform. We are currently in the strategic process of reorganizing the program and selecting development partners.”

Contact
Fraunhofer ITEM
Dr. Gerhard Pohlmann; +49 511 5350-116
gerhard.pohlmann@item.fraunhofer.de

Press contact
Fraunhofer ITEM
Dr. Cathrin Nastevska; +49 511 5350-225
cathrin.nastevska@item.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

The text of this press release can be found on our homepage at
http://www.item.fraunhofer.de/en/press-media/latest-news/pm-CPA-takeda.html

Dr. Cathrin Nastevska | Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Heart examinations: Miniature particle accelerator saves on contrast agents
27.02.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate
21.02.2017 | Radiological Society of North America

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>