Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Detecting skin cancer quickly

04.05.2015

Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, Fraunhofer researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis.

According to the German Cancer Society, around 200,000 people contract skin cancer every year. Melanoma is particularly dangerous. Once it has penetrated deeper layers of skin, the prospects of recovery drop to less than ten percent.


The Dermascanner scans the surface of a patient’s skin from different positions.

© Dirk Mahler/Fraunhofer IFF

Routine screening is the only way to detect critical skin changes at an early stage. A doctor uses a dermatoscope – a magnifier that peers into deeper layers of skin – to examine abnormal moles, called melanocytic nevus by experts, for features such as size, texture and edges and to observe whether they change over time. Since most people have many moles, the procedure is time consuming.

What is more, keeping an eye on changes such as the growth of individual moles is difficult since a doctor often cannot identify them with absolute certainty during the next exam.

Full body scanner helps diagnose skin conditions

At the initiative of and together with the University Clinic for Dermatology and Venerology in Magdeburg as well as the partners Dornheim Medical Images GmbH and Hasomed GmbH, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation IFF have developed a full body dermatological scanner intended to help doctors diagnose skin conditions in the future.

“The scanner delivers standard data for the evaluation of skin. At the same time, it improves documentation of the development every single conspicuous mole,” says Dr. Christian Teutsch from the Fraunhofer IFF. When the exam starts, the surface of the patient’s skin is scanned from different positions and broken down into approximately one hundred individual scans. Such image documentation already exists.

“The crucial point, however, is that the actual size and changes in growth cannot be clearly discerned solely on the bases of scans,” explains Teutsch.

That is why the Dermascanner generates additional scanned 3D data, which are fused with the 2D scans, thus assigning a scale to every single pixel in the image. The experts are integrating several 3D sensors in the scanner so that this functions. The sensors and cameras are calibrated so that their location in space is known precisely.

The beams of light from the camera striking the mole can be assigned a precise 3D distance. Even when different scans have not been taken from the exact same distance – which is hardly likely – the doctor can apply the scale to determine the actual proportions precisely. The scanned data and scans are fed into analysis software and analyzed and presorted by automatic classification. The software compares any existing earlier scans of development with current images.

“Our technology detects growth upwards of half a millimeter,” says Teutsch. Another advantage is that the scanned 3D data enables a doctor to clearly locate every single mole again.

“A single patient frequently has several hundred moles,” says Prof. Harald Gollnick, Director of the University Clinic for Dermatology and Venerology. When such a high risk patient visits the doctor again after a while, common methods of examination cannot discern whether the location and size moles on skin covered with pigmentation spots are still identical. According to Gollnick, “The new full body, early skin cancer detection system makes a nearly standard evaluation of skin condition and changes possible for the first time.”

“The diagnosis itself is and remains the doctor’s purview,” stresses Teutsch. Doctors have both the scan results and the scans with an additional 3D depth map, which records the distance of the individual pixels in the scan, at their disposal to make a diagnosis. Since minimal changes of an abnormal mole can already be significant, the scanned and image data have to be comparable at any time and also among different equipment.

That is why another important aspect of development was the standardization of the Dermascanner – another of the Fraunhofer IFF’s specializations. “We calibrate every relevant element such as light sources and convert the scans into a standard color space,” explains Teutsch. This assures that effects such as fading luminosity over time do not affect the results.

The Dermascanner is just about ready to be marketed. The first pilot systems have been built. What is more, the project team was recently awarded the 2014 Hugo Junkers Award for Research and Innovation in Saxony-Anhalt for its development by the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Economic Affairs (www.hugo-junkers-preis.de). Now, investors have to be found in order to mass produce the skin scanner.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.fraunhofer.de/en/press/research-news/2015/may/detecting-skin-cancer-q...

Britta Widmann | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Novel PET imaging agent could help guide therapy for brain diseases
03.04.2018 | Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

nachricht New Computer Architecture: Time Lapse for Dementia Research
29.03.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen e.V. (DZNE)

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>