Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

28.03.2017

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time the interior of cells present in a disease called Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), a chronic age-related lung disease killing 0.5 Million people each year worldwide.


GaN LED chip with optobiomedical chemical sensors

Hutomo Suryo Wasisto/TU Braunschweig

The new microscope will be affordable and ubiquitously available. In science, it is expected to lead to fundamental breakthroughs in virtually every field of research that currently makes use of optical microscopes – particularly in the medical field.

Making microscopic images will be easy and accessible to researchers who operate out in the field, away from scientific infrastructures and they will be affordable to researchers in developing countries. In the future, these microscopes-in-a-chip could also be integrated into consumer electronic products, being as common as a camera is in a smartphone today.
Background

Today, optical microscopes are limited in resolution by physical laws related to the wavelength of light, around half a thousandth of a millimetre. Single proteins, DNA molecules or the interior of living cells are much smaller and cannot be directly observed with conventional optical microscopes.

At the moment, only indirect observation - that means interpretation of measured data - can be made, for example in complex, expensive and bulky electron microscopes. These devices, however, are not suitable for the observation of delicate living tissues.
The Ambitious Project Objectives

The objective of the ChipScope project is to develop a new kind of optical microscope allowing to see the infinitely small. During the project, very small LEDs of 50 nanometers, this is 1000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair, will be developed and used as light sources for the new microscope which will be integrated on a chip.

The fundamental difference with conventional optical microscopy will be that the illumination is made by extremely small individual light sources instead of a wide illumination field and tiny detectors in the camera. This allows super-resolution optical microscopy, which could be used to investigate extremely small structures such as viruses, DNA or living cells, in real time.
A Highly Interdisciplinary Project Team

The ChipScope project is running from January2017 to December 2020. The project team includes SMEs, universities and research organisations under the leadership of the University of Barcelona. Other partners are the Technical University of Braunschweig in Germany, the University Tor Vergata in Rome, the company Expert Ymaging in Barcelona, the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, the Medical University of Vienna and the FSRM – the Swiss Foundation for Research in Microtechnology.

Contact

Dr. Thorben Dammeyer
LENA-Geschäftsführer
Technische Universität Braunschweig
Institut für Halbleitertechnik
Hans Sommer Straße 66
38106 Braunschweig
Tel.: 0531 391-3801
t.dammeyer@tu-braunschweig.de
www.tu-braunschweig.de/mib/lena

Weitere Informationen:

https://magazin.tu-braunschweig.de/pi-post/entwicklung-miniaturisierter-lichtmik...
https://www.tu-braunschweig.de/mib/lena
https://www.tu-braunschweig.de/mib/lena/quanomet
https://www.tu-braunschweig.de/iht

Stephan Nachtigall | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Rutgers researchers develop automated robotic device for faster blood testing
14.06.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht Speech comprehension with a cochlear implant
04.06.2018 | Universität zu Lübeck

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

Im Focus: Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

A boost for graphene-based light detectors

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries

19.06.2018 | Life Sciences

New material for splitting water

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>