Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Video to keep traffic flowing

07.06.2005


Motorway Traffic Control Centres use a range of sensors for traffic surveillance and control. The shortcomings of one type, magnetic loop detectors, has led researchers to successfully develop algorithms for alternative video sensors.



“Loop detectors have a short life span of two to three years before they break,” explains project partner Jo Versavel, General Manager, Traficon, Belgium. “They are also very expensive to repair because they involve road closings. Another drawback is that they are unreliable in congested traffic situations.”

Loop detectors consist of one or more loops of wire embedded in the pavement and connected to a control box, activated by a signal ranging in frequency from 10 KHz to 200 KHz. They are used to supply data on vehicle passage, presence, count and occupancy. Video sensors send live information to a control centre. For example, if an accident occurs, the data is sent in real time, which allows for a quicker response, decreasing the wait on the road as well as the resulting congestion.


Video sensors have proven advantages over traditional loop detectors. However, video-based information calls for modifications or a complete re-design of existing loop-based surveillance or control algorithms. Before they can be used in new systems, the efficiency of video sensors had to be tested and measured against loop detectors.

The IST programme-funded RHYTHM project developed new algorithms for traffic surveillance and control that use video-based data and rigorously compared them with algorithms that use loop-based data. Project partners focused on three surveillance tasks (estimating and predicting traffic flows, queue-tail tracking and travel time estimates) and one control task (isolated traffic-responsive ramp metering).

RHYTHM’s surveillance and control algorithms were tested using a microscopic off-line simulation under a variety of different conditions. This was followed by a successful demonstration on two sites of a German motorway – Munich’s A92 for surveillance and A94 for control tasks.

The algorithms developed under RHYTHM proved “robust and innovative”, according to Versavel. “For example, the Alinea Algorithm was used to measure queue length on a ramp using video detection. This would allow traffic controllers to avoid a spill over of congestion onto local road networks,” he explains.

Plans to commercialise the system developed under RHYTHM are being drawn up by the Technical University of Crete.

Tara Morris | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Realistic training for extreme flight conditions
28.12.2016 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>