Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Risk models can reduce number of collisions with wild animals

18.12.2003


Hundreds of thousands of animals are killed in traffic every year. The threat traffic represents to badgers is greater than was previously known. A new dissertation at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) illuminates the conflict between traffic and animals in Sweden and provides models that predict the risk of accidents involving wild animals.



It is only in recent years that the impact of traffic on animal populations has been taken seriously. Today increasing traffic is regarded as a considerable threat to biological diversity in the world. In his dissertation, Andreas Seiler, Department of Conservation Biology, Grimsö Research Station, SLU, presents a new picture of traffic mortality among some common Swedish mammals.

For most animal populations in Sweden, traffic does not constitute a serious threat to the species, despite high numbers of traffic deaths per year. For badgers, on the other hand, the situation is different: estimates indicate that 12-13 percent of the Swedish badger population dies on Swedish roads every year. This is very close to the level that the population can bear, assuming that pressures from hunting and other mortality are constant. Andreas Seiler and his research colleagues therefore recommend that greater attention be paid to badgers in constructing and maintaining roads.


Following extensive research into the connections between traffic, density of wild animal populations, the make-up of the landscape, and the number of collisions between cars and deer and moose reported to the police, Andreas Seiler has developed models to predict the risk of moose accidents. He has made use of remote analysis, landscape maps, and statistics on traffic, roadways, and moose density (indicated by hunting harvests). The models show that lower speed is the single greatest contributing factor in bringing down the risk of accidents.

A combination of lower speed limits and fencing, possibly in combination with alternative passages for animals and increased distance to adjacent woods, seems to be the most effective measure to prevent moose collisions. Preventing collisions between vehicles and especially moose, but wild animals in general, requires a holistic approach that involves road construction, property owners, and drivers.

Mikael Propst | alfa
Further information:
http://www.slu.se

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht From parking garage to smart multi-purpose garage
19.07.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Efficient and intelligent: Drones get to grips with planning the delivery of goods
12.07.2017 | Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>