Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Economic and effective security design

04.05.2015

Operators of infrastructures such as power grids and airports are expected to ensure a high level of security – but their financial means are limited. Fraunhofer researchers have developed an analysis tool for evaluating the effectiveness and economic viability of different security measures as part of an EU-funded project.

Storms are capable of paralyzing entire cities. Only recently, in the first week of April, large parts of Germany were deprived of power due to hurricane-force winds. Rail services were cancelled, elevators were blocked, and computer screens went blank.


Measures to assure the security of rail stations and other public infrastructures have a high priority.

© Fraunhofer ISST

Such extreme weather events often subside as quickly as they arrive but their effects reveal the Achilles heel of modern society, namely our dependence on critical infrastructures such as the power grid. Hence the urgent need for effective security measures. Other public infrastructures, such as airports and road networks, are similarly in need of increased security.

“Quite simply, all operators of critical infrastructures want to increase security in order to ward off acts of sabotage and other malicious attacks. At the same time, they also have to make sure such measures are cost effective,” says Prof. Jan Jürjens of the Fraunhofer Institute for Software and Systems Engineering ISST, describing the basic dilemma.

Researchers at the Dortmund-based institute have teamed up with international partners in the EU’s SECONOMICS project to develop an analysis tool that will enable infrastructure operators to evaluate existing and planned security measures in terms of their effectiveness and cost-efficiency. “Our system provides a founded basis for decisions that will enable users to optimize their security without over-stretching their financial resources,” says Jürjens.

Software provides a graphical map of security-related weak points

The starting point is a customized risk analysis of the current situation. The ISST researchers have developed a model-based software solution containing scenarios for different infrastructures. “After studying the security-related aspects identified during site visits, we put together a set of mathematical algorithms that allow us to determine their interrelationship,” explains Jürjens.

In the case of airports, for example, relevant parameters include the number of security checks, the human resources available, and imposed security regulations such as the presence of liquids in carry-on baggage. In order to tailor the analysis to specific circumstances, the user enters data concerning each of these factors via the user interface – for example staffing levels at the security gate.

The risk analysis software uses these data to create a model scenario and present the results in the form of a graphical diagram. As well as revealing existing weak points, this simulation can also be used to verify the effectiveness and cost-efficiency of planned security measures by varying different parameters, for instance by increasing the number of available personnel. This type of walk-through analysis helps to predict the effect of individual measures on overall security and calculate the necessary investments.

In addition to finding a smart way of correlating the various security aspects, the scientists were also faced with the challenge of managing large quantities of heterogeneous data. “Evaluating the effectiveness of security measures involves factoring in a large number of individual components – a process that, in order to be user-friendly, requires fast processing speeds,” says Jürjens. This is where the ISST’s many years of experience in big data management has proved to be an advantage.

The analysis tool has already demonstrated its practical use in case studies conducted by the project partners, including the evaluation of a U.K. power supply network, Barcelona’s subway system, and a Turkish airport. The software has also been in use for many years at Fraunhofer ISST for consultations with research clients. The project’s final results were recently presented in Brussels. A number of new scenarios are being prepared and, in a next step, the project partners aim to produce a marketable version of their virtual toolbox.

Britta Klocke | Fraunhofer Research News
Further information:
http://www.fraunhofer.de/en/press/research-news/2015/may/economic-and-effective-security-design.html

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Study sets new distance record for medical drone transport
13.09.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

nachricht Researchers 'count cars' -- literally -- to find a better way to control heavy traffic
10.08.2017 | Florida Atlantic University

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Metallic nanoparticles will help to determine the percentage of volatile compounds

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America

20.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>