Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Single Molecule Detection Machine for Nucleic Acid Analytics

07.09.2015

Fraunhofer FIT will present a Single Molecule Detection Machine for the analysis of ultra-small amounts of nucleic acid. The system can be used to identify biomarkers that are early indicators of a disease or allow forecasting the response to a therapy. Fraunhofer FIT will also demonstrate their ZETA imaging software that is used in drug research.

Supersensitive detection systems are becoming an important element of today's Life Sciences. Their development aims to achieve utmost sensitivity and smallest possible sample consumption in detecting and determining the amount of bio molecules, in order to be able to diagnose diseases earlier, to find new active ingredients faster and more reliably, to prove the presence of environmental pollutants, or to control the quality of biological processes.

Fraunhofer FIT researchers now present a Single Molecule Detection Machine (SMDM) developed especially for these application fields. It uses a highly sensitive confocal microscope, also developed by Fraunhofer FIT, and fluorescence detection.

Fluorescent markers are attached to bio molecules, e.g., DNA, RNA and proteins; a laser is used to induce fluorescence. This detection mode is not only highly sensitive, but it can also produce a wide range of information about the type and behavior of the marked bio molecules.

»It took us several years of R&D to find our method of analysis, which is based on single molecule brightness levels, and to turn it into an algorithm. The resulting process now lets us generate the information we need about the molecule faster and with higher precision«, says Prof. Harald Mathis, head of the BioMOS group at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology FIT, and also of the Fraunhofer SYMILA Application Center at Hamm-Lippstadt.

The smallest molecule concentration detectable by the SMDM is an unimaginably low 1 pg/µl (one trillionth of a gram per one millionth of a liter). By way of comparison: The system can detect that one cube of sugar was dissolved in three million liters water, roughly the amount of water contained in 1.2 Olympic swimming pools each 50 m long, 25 m wide and 2 m deep. One cubic millimeter of this water would be enough to carry out the test.

In the Ribolution project, funded by Fraunhofer Zukunftsstiftung, we are currently using the SMDM for quality control in nucleic acid analytics, specifically to determine the mass concentration of nucleic acids with high sensitivity.

Actually, the sensitivity we achieve is several orders of magnitude higher than competing systems using UV absorption. In addition, our system performs its measurements on sample volumes of <1µl (less than one millionth of a liter), thus reducing costs by minimizing sample consumption. Currently, we can quantify DNA as well as RNA mixtures in concentrations ranging from 1 to 1,000 pg µl-1.

The SMDM is also capable of measuring, with high sensitivity, the lengths of strands in nucleic acid mixtures. To determine distributions of lengths of strands precisely we developed an Open Micro-Electrophoresis Chip (OMEC) and integrated it with the SMDM. This chip allows us separate molecules for the analysis at the single molecule level.

Our second exhibit at BIOTECHNICA 2015 is our ZETA imaging software. We developed it specifically for the High Content Analysis of live cell imaging data, where cells are monitored and recorded over their full life cycle. Due to its open interfaces, ZETA can easily be integrated with complete High Content Analysis workflows and thus can support researchers in a wide range of applications in drug research.

Alex Deeg | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT
Further information:
http://www.fit.fraunhofer.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Not of Divided Mind
19.01.2017 | Hertie-Institut für klinische Hirnforschung (HIH)

nachricht CRISPR meets single-cell sequencing in new screening method
19.01.2017 | CeMM Forschungszentrum für Molekulare Medizin der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New Study Will Help Find the Best Locations for Thermal Power Stations in Iceland

19.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Not of Divided Mind

19.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Molecule flash mob

19.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>