Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Salicylic acid, a widespread ingredient in pain relief medication, promotes nasal mucosa colonizati

03.02.2017

Salicylic acid is a plant hormone best known for its use as a key ingredient in pain relievers, anti-acne preparations and medications for skin conditions. We also consume mild doses of salicylic acid when we eat fruits and vegetables. Researchers, including scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna, have now shown that the multifaceted compound can also have an unpleasant side effect. Salicylic acid forms complexes with iron, an important trace element. Laboratory tests showed that iron limitation strongly promotes the formation of biofilms by S. aureus. This allows the bacteria to persist in our respiratory tract possibly causing infections. Published in Frontiers in Microbiology.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ) can colonize the upper respiratory tract of around one quarter of the human population. As an opportunistic bacteria S. aureus usually does not harm its host. If the host is healthy and the bacteria obtain sufficient nutrients, the bacteria remain quiet and are kept under control by the immune system. They may, however, become active in response to infections by another pathogen or illness weakening the host immune system.


Salicylic acid complexes iron and thus limits the substance for S. aureus colonies. This promotes the formation of biofilms.

Tom Grunert/Vetmeduni Vienna

The regular consumption of salicylic acid, or its consumption in higher doses, could unexpectedly promote and prolong bacterial colonization, as shown by a joint study conducted by Monika Ehling-Schulz’s group from the Institute of Microbiology, Vetmeduni Vienna, together with the research group of Fernanda Buzzola from the University of Buenos Aires. The research stays were in part funded by the Mobility Programme for Scientific and Technological Cooperation between Austria and Argentina.

Salicylic acid deprives the body of iron and triggers a defence mechanism in the bacteria

Iron is an important trace element for the human body and plays an essential role in blood formation. The metabolism of many bacteria, including S. aureus, also depends on the availability of iron molecules. Salicylic acid forms complexes with iron ions in the blood and so deprives not only us but also the staphylococcal bacteria of this element.

S. aureus modifies its metabolism if it obtains no or only insufficient iron. The microorganism reacts to the changed – from its perspective, negative – conditions through the intensified formation of a biofilm, a sort of layer of slime formed by the aggregation of individual bacteria, as Tom Grunert of the Institute for Microbiology at Vetmeduni Vienna explains. The accelerated biofilm production allows the bacteria to survive for an even longer period under unfavourable living conditions.

This increased biofilm formation is promoted by the regular or increased consumption of salicylic acid. As pain relief medication, this compound is usually not taken regularly. However, it also is a component of anti-acne preparations and certain exfoliate products, which are often used for a longer period of time. Since salicylic acid is found in fruits and vegetables, people who follow a mostly vegetarian diet might also affected. “These people consume a small dose of the substance virtually every day,” says Grunert. The use of certain medications further increases the iron limitation. Taken orally, salicylic acid enters the blood circulation and forms there complexes with the iron ions.

Enhanced biofilm formation after consumption of salicylic acid in experimental settings

The research team demonstrated this effect in a laboratory experiment. “We first confirmed that salicylic acid, which is known for its capacity to form iron complexes, really does ‘capture’ the iron that is important for the staphylococcal bacteria,” says Grunert. The formation of the bacterial biofilm was then demonstrated through different doses of salicylic acid. “We grew a staphylococcal culture in a special, iron-rich medium – a nutrient solution – in a laboratory dish.” The addition of salicylic acid resulted in a further increase of biofilm. Moreover, the treatment of mice with salicylic acid demonstrably resulted in prolonged colonization of the nasal mucosa by S. aureus.

“We were able to show that the frequent consumption of salicylic acid as well as a vegetarian diet can promote the colonization of the upper respiratory tract by S. aureus, which may contribute to staphylococcal infections that are long lasting and more difficult to treat” explains Grunert.

Service:
The article “The Active Component of Aspirin, Salicylic Acid, Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation in a PIA-dependent Manner” by Cristian Dotto, Andrea Lombarte Serrat, Natalia Cattelan, María S. Barbagelata, Osvaldo M. Yantorno, Daniel O. Sordelli, Monika Ehling-Schulz, Tom Grunert and Fernanda R. Buzzola was published in Frontiers in Microbiology.
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmicb.2017.00004/full

About the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna
The University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna in Austria is one of the leading academic and research institutions in the field of Veterinary Sciences in Europe. About 1,300 employees and 2,300 students work on the campus in the north of Vienna which also houses five university clinics and various research sites. Outside of Vienna the university operates Teaching and Research Farms. http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at

Scientific Contact:
Tom Grunert
Institute of Microbiology
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
T +43 1 25077-2469
tom.grunert@vetmeduni.ac.at

Released by:
Georg Mair
Science Communication / Corporate Communications
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
T +43 1 25077-1165
georg.mair@vetmeduni.ac.at

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/en/infoservice/presseinformation/press-releases-2017/...

Mag.rer.nat Georg Mair | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Veterinary Medicine bacteria mucosa pain relief salicylic acid

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Bacteria as pacemaker for the intestine
22.11.2017 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

nachricht Researchers identify how bacterium survives in oxygen-poor environments
22.11.2017 | Columbia University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Corporate coworking as a driver of innovation

22.11.2017 | Business and Finance

PPPL scientists deliver new high-resolution diagnostic to national laser facility

22.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Quantum optics allows us to abandon expensive lasers in spectroscopy

22.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>