Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New probe developed for improved high resolution measurement of brain temperature

21.07.2016

Improved accuracy could allow researchers to measure brain temperature in times of trauma when small deviations in temperature can lead to additional brain injury

The brain is the most temperature-sensitive organ in the body. Even small deviations in brain temperature are capable of producing profound effects--including behavioral changes, cell toxicity, and neuronal cell death. The problem faced by researchers and clinicians is how to measure and understand these changes in the brain and how they are influenced by complex biochemical and physiological pathways that may be altered by disease, brain injury or drug abuse.


The optical fiber probe can generate and harness light to detect temperature changes in biological systems.

Research Contact: Stefan Musolino stefan.musolino@adelaide.edu.au Erik Schartner erik.schartner@adelaide.edu.au

In a new paper published in Biomedical Optics Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), Stefan Musolino of the University of Adelaide and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Australia, and his colleagues describe a new optical fiber-based probe capable of making pinpoint brain temperature measurements in moving lab animals.

"Within our center we house physicists, chemists, and medical researchers and one of the interests of our center's 'Origin of Sensation' theme is temperature change in the central nervous system," Musolino said. "It is only recently that more studies in my area of research-- drug-induced hyperthermia-- have started looking at changes in brain temperature in addition to changes in core body temperature within drug-treated animals. We wanted to further investigate these drug-induced brain temperature changes using center developed probes in order to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms driving them."

The probe developed by Musolino and his colleagues consists of an optical fiber, sheathed within a protective sleeve and encased within a 4-millimeter-long 25-gauge needle. The end-face of the approximately 2-mm-long probe tip is dipped into molten glass made of tellurite, doped with a small amount of the rare-earth oxide erbium. When inserted into the brain, the color of the light emitted from the erbium ions will vary depending on the temperature of the surrounding tissue; the temperature of that tissue can thus be determined by monitoring the light of these color changes. This method allows for measurements to be performed with a precision of a fraction of a degree (0.1°C).

"The area that can measure temperature is less than 125 micrometers in size," said study co-author Erik Schartner "making it highly spatially precise and able to isolate temperature readings from very small brain areas." The researchers say it is possible to make the temperature-sensing area of the probe tip smaller still -- as small as a few microns across -- by modifying the probe's design.

The probe's immediate application will be to investigate changes in brain temperature within moving lab animals exposed to certain drugs of abuse, such MDMA (or 'ecstasy'). "We will also look at the possible therapeutic properties of the tetracycline antibiotic minocycline and its ability to attenuate the changes in temperature caused by the administration of MDMA," said Musolino. "In the future we will also be looking into combining this probe with other optical sensors in the hopes of developing new optical fiber-based sensing techniques for use in medical science labs that are examining real-word medical problems."

Eventually, a fully developed probe could be used in human brain temperature monitoring after traumatic brain injury, stroke or hemorrhage -- times when the brain is extremely sensitive and small deviations in temperature can lead to additional brain injury.

"Continuous monitoring of brain temperature after brain injury would allow for the effects of hyperthermia management techniques such as anti-pyretics -- drugs that reduces fever -- and hypothermia to be observed and evaluated by clinicians in real time," Musolino said. "These new tools and this deeper understanding will ultimately give us better understanding of the brain and how to more quickly react to brain injury."

###

Paper: Stefan Musolino, Erik P. Schartner, Georgios Tsiminis, Abdallah Salem, Tanya M. Monro, and Mark R. Hutchinson, "Portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements," Biomed. Opt. Express 7, 3069-3077 (2016). DOI: 10.1364/BOE.7.003069.

About Biomedical Optics Express

Biomedical Optics Express is OSA's principal outlet for serving the biomedical optics community with rapid, open-access, peer-reviewed papers related to optics, photonics and imaging in the life sciences. The journal scope encompasses theoretical modeling and simulations, technology development, and biomedical studies and clinical applications. It is published by The Optical Society and edited by Christoph Hitzenberger of The Medical University of Vienna. Biomedical Optics Express is an open-access journal and is available at no cost to readers online at: OSA Publishing.

About The Optical Society

Founded in 1916, The Optical Society (OSA) is the leading professional organization for scientists, engineers, students and entrepreneurs who fuel discoveries, shape real-life applications and accelerate achievements in the science of light. Through world-renowned publications, meetings and membership initiatives, OSA provides quality research, inspired interactions and dedicated resources for its extensive global network of optics and photonics experts. For more information, visit osa.org/100.

Media Contact

Rebecca Andersen
RAndersen@osa.org
202-416-1443

 @opticalsociety

http://www.osa.org 

Rebecca Andersen | EurekAlert!

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movement
26.06.2017 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

nachricht New insight into a central biological dogma on ion transport
26.06.2017 | Aarhus University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movement

26.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Smooth propagation of spin waves using gold

26.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Switchable DNA mini-machines store information

26.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>