Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Multiple models reveal new genetic links in autism

11.11.2014

For answers, researchers turned to mice, stem cells and the 'tooth fairy'

With the help of mouse models, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the "tooth fairy," researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have implicated a new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism. The gene is associated with Rett syndrome, a syndromic form of autism, suggesting that different types of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may share similar molecular pathways.


This is Alysson Muotri, Ph.D.

Credit: UC San Diego School of Medicine

The findings are published in the Nov. 11, 2014 online issue of Molecular Psychiatry.

"I see this research as an example of what can be done for cases of non-syndromic autism, which lack a definitive group of identifying symptoms or characteristics," said principal investigator Alysson Muotri, PhD, associate professor in the UC San Diego departments of Pediatrics and Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

"One can take advantage of genomics to map all mutant genes in the patient and then use their own iPSCs to measure the impact of these mutations in relevant cell types. Moreover, the study of brain cells derived from these iPSCs can reveal potential therapeutic drugs tailored to the individual. It is the rise of personalized medicine for mental/neurological disorders."

But to effectively exploit iPSCs as a diagnostic tool, Muotri said researchers "need to compare neurons derived from hundreds or thousands of other autistic individuals." Enter the "Tooth Fairy Project," in which parents are encouraged TO register for a "Fairy Tooth Kit," which involves sending researchers like Muotri a discarded baby tooth from their autistic child. Scientists extract dental pulp cells from the tooth and differentiate them into iPSC-derived neurons for study.

"There is an interesting story behind every single tooth that arrives in the lab," said Muotri.

The latest findings, in fact, are the result of Muotri's first tooth fairy donor. He and colleagues identified a de novo or new disruption in one of the two copies of the TRPC6 gene in iPSC-derived neurons of a non-syndromic autistic child. They confirmed with mouse models that mutations in TRPC6 resulted in altered neuronal development, morphology and function. They also noted that the damaging effects of reduced TRPC6 could be rectified with a treatment of hyperforin, a TRPC6-specific agonist that acts by stimulating the functional TRPC6 in neurons, suggesting a potential drug therapy for some ASD patients.

The researchers also found that MeCP2 levels affect TRPC6 expression. Mutations in the gene MeCP2, which encodes for a protein vital to the normal function of nerve cells, cause Rett syndrome, revealing common pathways among ASD.

"Taken together, these findings suggest that TRPC6 is a novel predisposing gene for ASD that may act in a multiple-hit model," Muotri said. "This is the first study to use iPSC-derived human neurons to model non-syndromic ASD and illustrate the potential of modeling genetically complex sporadic diseases using such cells."

For more information on the Tooth Fairy Project, visit http://muotri.ucsd.edu .

Co-authors include Karina Griesi-Oliveira, UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego and Universidade de Sao Paulo; Allan Acab, Thanathom Chailangkarn, Yanelli Nunez, Xiang Guoe and Gabriel Haddad, UCSD Department of Pediatrics and Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego; Abha R. Gupta, Yale University; Daniele Yumi Sunaga, Estavao Vadasz and Maria Rita Passos-Bueno, Universidade de Sao Paulo; Xavier Nicol and Nicholas Spitzer, UCSD Division of Biological Sciences and Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind; Michael F. Walker, John D. Murdoch, Stephan J. Sanders, Thomas V. Fernandez, Matthew W. State, Weizhen Ji and Richard P. Lifton, Yale University; Alexander Dietrich, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen; Dennis Pradhan, Hongjun Song and Guo-li Ming, Johns Hopkins University; and Maria C.N. Marchetto, Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Funding support for this research came, in part, from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the National Institutes of Health (grants 1-DP2-OD006495-01, T32 GM008666, NS047344, NS048271, HD069184, K08MH087639 and RC2MH089956), the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico.

Scott LaFee | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: ASD BRAIN Medicine Molecular Rett syndrome UCSD mouse models neurons

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Transport of molecular motors into cilia
28.03.2017 | Aarhus University

nachricht Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
28.03.2017 | University of California - Riverside

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>