Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Molecular Bodyguards for Immature Membrane Proteins

08.09.2015

During their formation within the cells, many proteins rely on the assistance of molecular protectors, so-called chaperones. They help the proteins to fold correctly and thus ensure the right final structure. The roles of chaperones in membrane protein folding have long remained unclear. Researchers at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, and at ETH Zurich have now shown how chaperones stabilize an immature bacterial membrane protein and guide it in the right folding direction, thus protecting it from misfolding. Their study was recently published in “Nature Structural & Molecular Biology”.

Cellular machines continuously produce long polypeptide chains, the proteins. In order to properly fulfill its cellular function, a protein must however first adopt its correct spatial structure. In each cell there are molecular helper proteins called chaperones. They take care of the immature proteins to help them in the folding process and thus preventing errors.


Chaperones (light blue) promote the insertion and folding of the bacterial membrane protein FhuA (yellow).

University of Basel, Biozentrum

The scientists led by Prof. Sebastian Hiller from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, and Prof. Daniel Müller from the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE), ETH Zurich in Basel have discovered how two chaperones in the gut bacterium E. coli protect the membrane protein FhuA during transport and assist its insertion into the membrane.

Chaperones help insertion of membrane protein

... more about:
»Biozentrum »Bodyguards »ETH »bacteria »proteins »structure

Countless proteins, which transport nutrients and signaling molecules, are embedded in the outer membrane of bacteria. One of these membrane transporters is the protein FhuA. Via this protein, the bacteria take up vitally important iron but also antibiotics. But how does the very large, barrel-shaped FhuA protein reach the outer membrane intact? The scientists from the Biozentrum and the D-BSSE have investigated this process more deeply.

In order to reach its goal in the outer membrane, FhuA uses the help of several chaperones. Using structural analyses and single-molecule force spectroscopy, the researchers have now elucidated how these two chaperones stabilize the immature protein and prevent misfolding. “This process is extremely dynamic,” says Hiller.

“Under the protection of the chaperones, within a millisecond, FhuA constantly changes its structure. It thus explores energetically favorable conformations which enable the stepwise insertion and folding of individual protein segments into the membrane.” With the insertion of the final protein segment, FhuA acquires its mature and functional barrel structure. Left unprotected, FhuA would fold incorrectly and finally aggregate.

Protein chaos without chaperones

Chaperones are significantly involved in the formation of functional proteins. They play an important role in the correct folding of soluble proteins and furthermore are necessary for the insertion of membrane proteins into the bacterial outer membrane. Because several organelles in plant and animal cells are of bacterial origin, chaperones also protect their membrane proteins in a similar manner and assist during membrane insertion. The new findings are consequently of great relevance also for diseases caused by misfolded proteins such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or cystic fibrosis.

“It has been known for a long time that chaperones protect other proteins from misfolding and encourage them to fold correctly. Now, our work has succeeded in demonstrating – for the first time in biological membranes – how chaperones support the membrane proteins that are key to pharmaceutical research,” explains ETH Professor Daniel Müller. Until recently, these could almost only be investigated using artificial environments. However, this meant that there was barely any understanding of how proteins fold into a cell’s membrane.

“To give a loose analogy, until now it was like putting a cow on a sheet of ice in order to investigate its natural behaviour and then observing surprising reactions,” says Müller. “We now have a better understanding of how the cell incorporates its molecular machines into membranes so that they can perform their versatile duties.”

Original source

Johannes Thoma, Björn M Burmann, Sebastian Hiller & Daniel J Müller
Impact of holdase chaperones Skp and SurA on the folding of β-barrel outer-membrane proteins
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology (2015), doi: 10.1038/nsmb.3087

Further information

Prof. Sebastian Hiller, University of Basel, Biozentrum, tel. +41 61 267 20 82, email: sebastian.hiller@unibas.ch
Prof. Daniel J. Müller, ETH Zurich, Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering, tel. +41 61 387 33 07, email: daniel.mueller@bsse.ethz.ch

Katrin Bühler | Universität Basel
Further information:
http://www.unibas.ch

Further reports about: Biozentrum Bodyguards ETH bacteria proteins structure

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht At last, butterflies get a bigger, better evolutionary tree
16.02.2018 | Florida Museum of Natural History

nachricht New treatment strategies for chronic kidney disease from the animal kingdom
16.02.2018 | Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

Im Focus: Autonomous 3D scanner supports individual manufacturing processes

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time. The autonomous scanning system will be on display at the Hannover Messe Preview on February 6 and at the Hannover Messe proper from April 23 to 27, 2018 (Hall 6, Booth A30).

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fingerprints of quantum entanglement

16.02.2018 | Information Technology

'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers

16.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Hubble sees Neptune's mysterious shrinking storm

16.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>