Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

An Attractive new Bat Species from West Africa

28.01.2016

A quarter of all mammal species on earth are bats. About 25% of the nearly 1000 bat species live in Africa. Almost every year new species are discovered, which shows that this group of mammals has been only insufficiently studied.

During research on the small mammal diversity in the West African country of Guinea, mammalogist Dr. Jan Decher from the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig - Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversityin Bonn and his team discovered an attractive small bat, which will have the scientific name Neoromicia isabella in future, or Isabelline White-winged Serotine in English.


Isabelline White-winged Serotine bat (Neoromicia isabella) from the Simandou-Mountains in Guinea

(Photo: © Jan Decher 2008)

The tiny bat has a body length of 4-5 cm and weighs about 5 grams. Flight membranes, tail membrane and the fur of the belly are colored white; the ears, lips and feet are also almost white. In contrast, the hairs on the back are isabella-coloured, that is light orange-brown.

This unique contrasting colouration differs from all other species occurring in West Africa. Genetic studies carried out in the Centre for Molecular Biodiversity at Museum Koenig support its status as a new species.

Between 2008 and 2012 researcher from Germany, The United States and Swaziland discovered the Isabelline White-winged Serotine during environmental impact assessments in the Simandou and Nimba Mountains of southeastern Guinea.

The species occurs in relatively undisturbed rainforest areas that are part of iron ore mining concessions awarded to international mining companies. The biological surveys were designed to assess which rare animal and plant species occur on the mountains and provide data for planning the mining operation as environmentally sustainable as possible.

In the Simandou Mountains 35 bat species were found. Species richness estimations showed that up to 45 bat species may occur there. Thus, the Simandou Mountains are one of the regions with the most diverse bat fauna in Africa.

Contact:
Dr. Jan Decher
Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig
Adenauerallee 160, D-53113 Bonn, Germany
Phone: +49 228 9122262
E-mail: j.decher@zfmk.de

Source:
Decher, J., Hoffmann, A., Schaer, J., Norris, R.W., Kadjo, B., Astrin, J., Monadjem, A., Hutterer, R. 2016. Bat diversity in the Simandou Mountain Range of Guinea, with the description of a new white-winged vespertilionid. Acta Chiropterologica 17(2): 255-282 (for 2015)

doi: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.3161/15081109ACC2015.17.2.003

The Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig (ZFMK) and Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversity is one of the largest natural-history-research museums in Germany. The museum has earned its reputation as a leader in the documentation, research, and interpretation of biodiversity.

The Leibniz Association is a network of 89 scientifically, legally and economically independent research institutes and scientific service facilities. Leibniz Institutes perform strategic- and thematically-oriented research and offer scientific service of national significance while striving to find scientific solutions for major social challenges.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.3161/15081109ACC2015.17.2.003

Sabine Heine | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.zfmk.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>