Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

An Attractive new Bat Species from West Africa

28.01.2016

A quarter of all mammal species on earth are bats. About 25% of the nearly 1000 bat species live in Africa. Almost every year new species are discovered, which shows that this group of mammals has been only insufficiently studied.

During research on the small mammal diversity in the West African country of Guinea, mammalogist Dr. Jan Decher from the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig - Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversityin Bonn and his team discovered an attractive small bat, which will have the scientific name Neoromicia isabella in future, or Isabelline White-winged Serotine in English.


Isabelline White-winged Serotine bat (Neoromicia isabella) from the Simandou-Mountains in Guinea

(Photo: © Jan Decher 2008)

The tiny bat has a body length of 4-5 cm and weighs about 5 grams. Flight membranes, tail membrane and the fur of the belly are colored white; the ears, lips and feet are also almost white. In contrast, the hairs on the back are isabella-coloured, that is light orange-brown.

This unique contrasting colouration differs from all other species occurring in West Africa. Genetic studies carried out in the Centre for Molecular Biodiversity at Museum Koenig support its status as a new species.

Between 2008 and 2012 researcher from Germany, The United States and Swaziland discovered the Isabelline White-winged Serotine during environmental impact assessments in the Simandou and Nimba Mountains of southeastern Guinea.

The species occurs in relatively undisturbed rainforest areas that are part of iron ore mining concessions awarded to international mining companies. The biological surveys were designed to assess which rare animal and plant species occur on the mountains and provide data for planning the mining operation as environmentally sustainable as possible.

In the Simandou Mountains 35 bat species were found. Species richness estimations showed that up to 45 bat species may occur there. Thus, the Simandou Mountains are one of the regions with the most diverse bat fauna in Africa.

Contact:
Dr. Jan Decher
Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig
Adenauerallee 160, D-53113 Bonn, Germany
Phone: +49 228 9122262
E-mail: j.decher@zfmk.de

Source:
Decher, J., Hoffmann, A., Schaer, J., Norris, R.W., Kadjo, B., Astrin, J., Monadjem, A., Hutterer, R. 2016. Bat diversity in the Simandou Mountain Range of Guinea, with the description of a new white-winged vespertilionid. Acta Chiropterologica 17(2): 255-282 (for 2015)

doi: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.3161/15081109ACC2015.17.2.003

The Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig (ZFMK) and Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversity is one of the largest natural-history-research museums in Germany. The museum has earned its reputation as a leader in the documentation, research, and interpretation of biodiversity.

The Leibniz Association is a network of 89 scientifically, legally and economically independent research institutes and scientific service facilities. Leibniz Institutes perform strategic- and thematically-oriented research and offer scientific service of national significance while striving to find scientific solutions for major social challenges.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.3161/15081109ACC2015.17.2.003

Sabine Heine | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.zfmk.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals
23.08.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht Treating arthritis with algae
23.08.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Treating arthritis with algae

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Witnessing turbulent motion in the atmosphere of a distant star

23.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>