Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A versatile method to pattern functionalized nanowires

15.09.2016

A team of researchers from Hokkaido University has developed a versatile method to pattern the structure of “nanowires,” providing a new tool for the development of novel nanodevices.

There has been considerable interest worldwide in the patterning of functionalized nanowires—which excel both in semiconductivity and as catalyzers—due to the potential application of such materials in nanodevice construction. Establishing a versatile approach to make functionalized nanowires, with a particular need to controlling spatial patterning, has been seen as essential.


(Left) Growth of tandem fluorescent fibrils. Scale bar = 20 micrometers. (Right) Fibrils extended from gold nanoparticles placed on the surface of a substrate. Scale bar = 1 micrometer.

The team, led by Professor Kazuyasu Sakaguchi of the Faculty of Science’s Department of Chemistry, had previously developed an effective method, named structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs), to control self-assembly of amyloid peptides, which are the building blocks of nanowires and also known as the causative molecule for Alzheimer’s disease.

In the latest research, the team combined the SCAPs with templated fibril growth—a distinctive quality of amyloid peptides—and succeeded in the formation of nanowires with tandem domain structures or a single nanowire extending from a specific starting point.

To create the tandem structure, the SCAPs method was used to make initial amyloid fibrils—marked by green fluorescence—which were used as a template, and to allow another type of amyloid peptide—marked by red fluorescence—extend from the starting fibrils.

Analysis showed a 67% tandem yield, three times higher than the efficiency yield of previous studies. Moreover, a few geometrical patterns could be discerned in the tandem structures, the proportion of which could be controlled by adjusting the peptide mix ratio.

Furthermore, by attaching template fibrils to gold nanoparticles placed on substrate surface through molecular recognition, then allowing new fibrils to extend from the template, the researchers succeeded in forming a single nanowire in a specific location. Achieving this kind of advanced pattern control is a world-first.

This method is applicable to the self-assembly of nanowires for nanoelectrodes created by lithography. “It could also be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns and hence open up new avenues for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices,” Professor Sakaguchi said.

Contacts:
Professor Kazuyasu Sakaguchi
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science
Hokkaido University
kazuyasu[at]sci.hokudai.ac.jp
http://wwwchem.sci.hokudai.ac.jp/~biochem/english/index.html

Naoki Namba (Media Officer)
Global Relations Office
Office of International Affairs
Hokkaido University
pr[at]oia.hokudai.ac.jp
Tel: +81-11-706-8034

Associated links

Journal information

Sakai H. et al., Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides, Scientific Reports, August 25, 2016. DOI: 10.1038/srep31993

Funding information

This work was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) (No. 24310152) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) (to K.S.), as well as a Research Fellowship from the JSPS for Young Scientists (No. 23-7100) (to H.S.).

Hokkaido University | Research SEA
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht 127 at one blow...
18.01.2017 | Stiftung Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Leibniz-Institut für Biodiversität der Tiere

nachricht How gut bacteria can make us ill
18.01.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level

18.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Data analysis optimizes cyber-physical systems in telecommunications and building automation

18.01.2017 | Information Technology

Reducing household waste with less energy

18.01.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>