Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A new sensor to detect physiological levels of nitrate and nitrite

11.12.2015

Researchers in Japan have created a new technique for visualizing the dynamics of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2−), both markers of nitric oxide in a cell.

A team led by Professor Takafumi Uchida has created a new technique for visualizing the dynamics of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2−), both markers of nitric oxide in a cell. Nitric oxide is a critical second messenger in the body, playing roles in vascular homeostasis, neurotransmission and host defense.


Copyright : Tohoku University


sNOOOpy in a human cancer line, HeLa cell. NO3− concentration increasing at intervals.

Copyright : Tohoku University

The new technology is called sNOOOpy which stands for "sensor for NO3-/NO2− in physiology." sNOOOpy is a genetically encoded intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based indicator that senses levels of nitrate and nitrite. sNOOOpy utilizes the NO3-/NO2--responsive two-component system of NasS and NasT system in the root nodule bacterium Bradyhizobium japonicum.

The researchers demonstrated with in vitro and cell culture studies that sNOOOpy can monitor intracellular levels in the micromolar range of nitrate and nitrite in real time. The authors say, "sNOOOpy is simple and potentially applicable to a wide variety of living cells. It is expected to provide insights into NO3−/NO2− dynamics in various organisms, including plants and animals." They also believe sNOOOpy will be useful for discovering new drugs and agricultural research.

This research was originally published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry © the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

Publication Details :

Authors:
Masafumi Hidaka†, Aina Gotoh†, Taiki Shimizu, Kiwamu Minamisawa, Hiromi Imamura and Takafumi Uchida1 († equal contribution) Admission is free with no reservation needed.
Please feel free to come in and out during the performance.
Bring your own snacks.

Title:
Visualization of NO3−/NO2− Dynamics in Living cells by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Imaging Employing a Rhizobial Two-Component Regulatory System.
Journal: Journal of Biological Chemistry (paper of the week)
DOI: jbc.M115.687632

Contact:
Takafumi Uchida


Associated links
Original article from Tohoku University
Watch the video from Tohoku University here

Ngaroma Riley | Research SEA
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Immune Defense Without Collateral Damage
23.01.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>