Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lego-like wall produces acoustic holograms

17.10.2016

New technology shapes sound waves for applications from speakers to ultrasound imaging

Research Triangle engineers have developed a simple, energy-efficient way to create three-dimensional acoustic holograms. The technique could revolutionize applications ranging from home stereo systems to medical ultrasound devices.


This is a close up look at the metamaterial device that can create acoustic holograms. Each grid or block contains a spiral of one of 12 various densities, each of which slows sound waves by a different amount.

Credit: Steve Cummer, Duke University

Most everyone is familiar with the concept of visual holograms, which manipulate light to make it appear as though a 3-D object is sitting in empty space. These optical tricks work by shaping the electromagnetic field so that it mimics light bouncing off an actual object.

Sound also travels in waves. But rather than electromagnetic energy traveling through space, sound propagates as pressure waves that momentarily compress the molecules they are traveling through. And just like visible light, these waves can be manipulated into three-dimensional patterns.

... more about:
»3-D »acoustic »holograms »sound wave »sound waves »waves

"We show the exact same control over a sound wave as people have previously achieved with light waves," said Steve Cummer, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke University. "It's like an acoustic virtual reality display. It gives you a more realistic sense of the spatial pattern of the sound field."

In a paper published Oct. 14 in Nature Scientific Reports, researchers at Duke and North Carolina State University show that they can create any three-dimensional pattern they want with sound waves. The achievement is made possible by metamaterials -- synthetic materials composed of many individual, engineered cells that together produce unnatural properties.

In this case, the metamaterials resemble a wall of Legos. Each individual block is made of plastic by a 3-D printer and contains a spiral within. The tightness of the spiral affects the way sound travels through it -- the tighter the coil, the slower sound waves travel through it.

While the individual blocks can't influence the sound wave's direction, the entire device effectively can. For example, if one side of the sound wave is slowed down but not the other, the resulting wave fronts will be redirected so that the sound is bent toward the slow side.

"Anybody can tell the difference between a single stereo speaker and a live string quartet playing music behind them," explained Yangbo "Abel" Xie, a doctoral student in Cummer's laboratory. "Part of the reason why is that the sound waves carry spatial information as well as notes and volume."

By calculating how 12 different types of acoustic metamaterial building blocks will affect the sound wave, researchers can arrange them in a wall to form any wave pattern on the other side that they want. With enough care, the sound waves can produce a specific hologram at a specific distance away.

"It's basically like putting a mask in front of a speaker," said Cummer. "It makes it seem like the sound is coming from a more complicated source than it is."

Cummer and Xie, in collaboration with Yun Jing, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NC State, and Tarry Shen, a doctoral student in Jing's lab, proved their sound mask works in two different ways. In the first test, they assembled a metamaterial wall that manipulated an incoming sound wave into a shape like the letter "A" about a foot away. In a second demonstration, they showed that the technique can focus sound waves into several "hot spots" -- or loud spots -- of sound, also a foot from the device.

There are existing technologies that can also produce this effect. Modern ultrasound imaging devices, for example, use phased arrays with many individual transducers that can each produce precisely controlled sound waves. But this approach has its drawbacks.

"If you've ever had an ultrasound done, you know there's a small wand attached to a much bigger machine a few feet away," said Cummer. "Not only can this setup be cumbersome, it consumes an enormous amount of power. Our approach can help produce the same effect in a cheaper, smaller system."

For the metamaterial device to work in such applications, however, each cell must be smaller than the waves it is manipulating. And for ultrasound technologies that operate in the megahertz range, this means the individual cells would have to be 100 times smaller than in the current demonstration blocks.

Cummer and Xie are looking for industry partners to show that this sort of fabrication would be possible. They are also shopping the idea around to industries that work in the kilohertz range, such as aerial sensing and imaging technologies. And of course, they're speaking with sound companies to make a single speaker sound more like a live orchestra.

"We're currently in the exploration phase, trying to determine where this technology would be useful," said Xie. "Any scenario where your goal is to control sound, this idea could be deployed. And it could be deployed to make something totally new, or to make something that already exists better, simpler or cheaper."

###

This work was partially supported by the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative grant from the Office of Naval Research (N00014-13-1-0631).

CITATION: "Acoustic Holographic Rendering with Two-Dimensional Metamaterial-Based Passive Phased Array," Yangbo Xie, Chen Shen, Wenqi Wang, Junfei Li, Dingjie Suo, Bogdan-Ioan Popa, Yun Jing, and Steven A. Cummer. Nature Scientific Reports, Oct. 14, 2016. DOI: 10.1038/srep35437

Media Contact

Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414

 @DukeU

http://www.duke.edu 

Ken Kingery | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: 3-D acoustic holograms sound wave sound waves waves

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies
20.10.2017 | Naval Research Laboratory

nachricht Integrated lab-on-a-chip uses smartphone to quickly detect multiple pathogens
19.10.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>