Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Rapid Detection of Cracks and Corrosion using Magnetic Stray Flux

28.04.2015

Whether it's fallen concrete pylons caused by corroded tension wires, a new motor due to damaged pistons or defective sheet steel, even the tiniest cracks or smallest traces of corrosion can have serious consequences, especially in safety-critical environments.

With magnetic stray flux inspections, these flaws can be quickly visualized without destroying or contaminating the material.


FLUXI: handheld stray flux inspection device (prototype shown)

Fraunhofer IZFP

As an alternative to magnetic powder tests, this method can also be used wherever the magnetic powder approach is unsuitable.

Engineers at Saarbrucken-based Fraunhofer IZFP will be introducing a mobile handheld device for magnetic stray flux testing at the 29th annual CONTROL trade fair in Stuttgart (hall 1, exhibit booth 1502), which runs May 5 to May 8.

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing IZFP in Saarbrucken have developed a handheld, wireless test device called FLUXI which is based on magnetic stray flux technology.

This method relies on the same physical effect exploited by magnetic powder testing, a standard and widely-used inspection process in steel manufacturing.

When an external magnetic field is applied to sharp-edged cracks on the surface of a component, additional magnetic dipoles form, which then induce magnetic leakage near the surface. This stray field can be detected and processed with magnetic field sensors.

The enormous potential for instrument technology miniaturization provides a key advantage since extremely difficult to access areas of the component can be quickly and easily subjected to magnetic stray flux inspections.

With FLUXI, manufactured parts and components can be rapidly scanned, allowing potential surface defects to be displayed as images.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.izfp.fraunhofer.de

Sabine Poitevin-Burbes | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP

More articles from Innovative Products:

nachricht A ski jacket that actively gets rid of sweat
30.01.2018 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

nachricht A fashionable chemical and biological threat detector-on-a-ring
12.10.2017 | American Chemical Society

All articles from Innovative Products >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

'Icebreaker' protein opens genome for t cell development, Penn researchers find

21.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

MEMS chips get metatlenses

21.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>