Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A fashionable chemical and biological threat detector-on-a-ring

12.10.2017

Wearable sensors are revolutionizing the tech-world, capable of tracking processes in the body, such as heart rates. They're even becoming fashionable, with many of them sporting sleek, stylish designs. But wearable sensors also can have applications in detecting threats that are external to the body. Researchers now report in ACS Sensors a first-of-its kind device that can do just that. And to stay fashionable, they've designed it as a ring.

According to a global analyst firm called CCS Insight, wearable electronics will be a $34 billion industry by 2020. Wearable chemical sensors currently in development include those made in the form of tattoos, mouth guards, wristbands and headbands, but all of these types of sensors face challenges.


A first-of-its kind ring sensor can detect chemical and biological threats.

Credit: American Chemical Society

For example, a sweat sensor worn on an arm could be useful, but patients would need to produce enough sweat for the device to be successful. There is a demand for sensors that are compact, affordable, noninvasive and can be incorporated into everyday life. But more advanced sensors can be costly and difficult to produce.

Joseph Wang and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego wanted to develop a portable, affordable, wearable sensor that would detect external chemical threats.

The team designed their sensor as a ring that can be worn on a finger. The ring has two parts, an electrochemical sensor cap for detecting chemical and biological threats, and a circuit board under the cap for processing and sending data wirelessly to a smartphone or laptop.

It can perform voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements, which allow the ring to detect a wide array of chemical threats. The team exposed the prototype to explosives and organophosphate nerve agents, both in vapor and liquid phases.

The ring was highly selective and sensitive. Although this ring-based sensor was designed to detect explosives and organophosphate nerve agents, the researchers say the device could be expanded to other hazardous environmental or security agents.

###

The authors acknowledge funding from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Joint Science and Technology Office for Chemical and Biological Defense.

The full text of this ACS Editors' Choice paper will be available on Oct. 11 at 8 a.m. Eastern time here: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acssensors.7b00603

The American Chemical Society is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: Twitter | Facebook

Media Contact

Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455

 @ACSpressroom

http://www.acs.org 

Katie Cottingham | EurekAlert!

More articles from Innovative Products:

nachricht Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks
22.02.2017 | Technische Universität Chemnitz

nachricht A shampoo bottle that empties completely -- every last drop
27.06.2016 | Ohio State University

All articles from Innovative Products >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

Im Focus: Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere

Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers.

Recent modeling along with previously published results from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft -- short for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and...

Im Focus: Austrian and Chinese Academies of Sciences successfully conducted first Inter-Continental Quantum Video Call

The two Academy presidents Chunli Bai and Anton Zeilinger tested quantum encrypted communication between Beijing and Vienna in a live-experiment. The quantum key was transmitted via the Chinese quantum satellite Micius.

From quantum cryptography to the quantum internet – fundamental research into the world of the quantum promises several new tech opportunities in the future....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

Conference Week RRR2017 on Renewable Resources from Wet and Rewetted Peatlands

28.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

The LBT gets polarized: First light for the PEPSI polarimeters

13.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

IVAM Product Market presents future intelligent medical technologies at COMPAMED 2017

13.10.2017 | Trade Fair News

Cold molecules on collision course

13.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>