Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Who can find the fish that makes the best sound?

28.02.2017

Using new computer algorithms, it is possible to adjust specific properties of three-dimensional objects, such as the sounds they produce or how stable they are.

Which sound will you hear if you strike a little metal fish with a drum stick? The answer to this question is fairly easy to work out using a computer these days. It is much more difficult to determine the shape of a metal object in order to generate a specific sound.


An object made of plastic is optimized to withstand a certain kind of stress particularly well.

TU Wien

The team led by Przemyslaw Musialski at TU Wien joined forces with Leif Kobbelt from RWTH Aachen to find a way to make this possible. Thanks to their work, specific complex requirements can now be defined for objects – including the sound they make or how resistant they are to certain mechanical stresses – and a computer algorithm is used to adapt the object such that it meets these particular specifications.

Changes to wall thickness

“We produce hollow objects or open shells with walls which are not uniform in their thickness,” explains Przemyslaw Musialski, Head of the Computational Fabrication Group at the Center for Geometry and Computational Design at TU Wien. “This variation in thickness allows us to adjust a whole range of properties in a targeted manner.” For example, an object made of plastic can be optimized such that it can withstand a certain kind of stress particularly well. The computer calculates how forces are distributed and what inner stresses are at play. The distribution of forces can be improved significantly by making changes to the wall thickness at the right points.

A similar process is used to change the sound made by metal objects. In order to demonstrate this principle, the team at TU Wien chose a number of different animal shapes, including a giraffe and a fish, and used the computer algorithm to adjust the thickness of the metal in such a way that a specific sound spectrum is exhibited when the objects are struck. They ended up with what is effectively a zoo glockenspiel!

New method to speed up calculations

“We are talking about some quite complex calculations here,” explains Musialski. “When you can change the thickness at any point, the number of different possibilities is huge. It is just not possible to simulate every single one of them on a computer. Instead, what you need is a carefully designed method that allows you to find a solution within a reasonable time frame.”

The important thing to remember is that in these cases there is normally not just one single solution. There is usually a range of shapes that will achieve the outcome one is looking for. Rather than finding the ideal shape, one just needs to ensure that the computer outputs a result that is sufficient.

“On this basis, we have managed to devise a new optimization method that reduces the design space drastically,” explains Przemyslaw Musialski. “It is then possible to find a good solution in the remaining subspace with great efficiency.” The results of the research were presented at the ACM SIGGRAPH 2016 conference and published in the journal ACM Transactions on Graphics (TOG) recently.

Video:
Several results achieved using the new method are presented in this video, including the zoo glockenspiel, a rabbit-shaped bell and a plastic cat that can withstand high mechanical stresses:
https://youtu.be/AScDKsL5H7g

Original publication: http://dl.acm.org/author_page.cfm?id=99658729263
Musialski P, Hafner C, Rist F, Birsak M, Wimmer M, Kobbelt L
Non-linear shape optimization using local subspace projections. ACM Trans Graph.
2016; 35(4):1-13. DOI: 10.1145/2897824.2925886.

Picture download: https://www.tuwien.ac.at/dle/pr/aktuelles/downloads/2017/fisch

Further information:
Dr. Przemyslaw Musialski
TU Wien
Institute of Discrete Mathematics and Geometry
Wiedner Hauptstr. 8, 1040 Vienna
T: +43-1-58801-10442
przemyslaw.musialski@tuwien.ac.at

Weitere Informationen:

https://youtu.be/AScDKsL5H7g Several results achieved using the new method are presented in this video, including the zoo glockenspiel, a rabbit-shaped bell and a plastic cat that can withstand high mechanical stresses

Dr. Florian Aigner | Technische Universität Wien

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Cloud technology: Dynamic certificates make cloud service providers more secure
15.01.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht New discovery could improve brain-like memory and computing
10.01.2018 | University of Minnesota

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors

22.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

22.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parent

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks Wissenschaft & Forschung
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>