Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

HPC System Hornet Ready to Serve Highest Computational Demands

30.03.2015

HLRS Supercomputer Successfully Executed Extreme-Scale Simulation Projects

Supercomputer Hornet of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) is ready for extreme-scale computing challenges. The newly installed HPC system (High Performance Computing) successfully finished extensive simulation projects that by far exceeded the calibre of previously performed simulation runs at HLRS:


Der HLRS-Supercomputer Hornet, ein Cray XC40 System, liefert eine Rechenhöchstleistung von 3,8 Petaflops (3,8 Billiarden Rechenoperationen pro Sekunde).

(c) Boris Lehner für HLRS/Universität Stuttgart


Feinskalige Wolkenstrukturen des Taifuns Soulik, dargestellt mittels der langwelligen Ausstrahlung am Oberrand des Modells.

(c) Universität Hohenheim

Six so called XXL-Projects from computationally demanding scientific fields such as planetary research, climatology, environmental chemistry, aerospace, and scientific engineering were recently applied on the HLRS supercomputer. With each application scaling up to all of Hornet’s available 94,646 compute cores, the machine was put through a demanding endurance test. The achieved results more than satisfied the HLRS HPC experts as well as the scientific users: Hornet lived up to the challenge and passed the simulation “burn-in runs” with flying colors.

The new HLRS supercomputer Hornet, a Cray XC40 system which in its current configuration delivers a peak performance of 3.8 PetaFlops (1 PetaFlops = 1 quadrillion floating point operations per second), was declared “up and running” in late 2014.

In its early installation phase, prior to making the machine available for general use, HLRS had invited national scientists and researchers from various fields to apply large-scale simulation projects on Hornet. The goal was to deliver evidence that all related HPC hardware and software components required to smoothly run highly complex and extreme-scale compute jobs are up and ready for top-notch challenges. Six perfectly suited XXL-Projects were identified and implemented on the HLRS supercomputer:

(1) “Convection Permitting Channel Simulation”, Institute of Physics and Meteorology, Universität Hohenheim
(84,000 compute cores, 84 compute hours, 330 TB of data + 120 TB for pre-processing)
Objective: Run a latitude belt simulation around the Earth at a resolution of a few km for a time period long enough to cover various extreme events on the Northern hemisphere and to study the model performance.

(2) “Direct Numerical Simulation of a Spatially-Developing Turbulent Boundary Along a Flat Plate”, Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG), Universität Stuttgart
(93,840 compute cores, 70 machine hours, 30 TB of data)
Objective: To conduct a direct numerical simulation of the complete transition of a boundary layer flow to fully-developed turbulence along a flat plate up to high Reynolds numbers.

(3) “Prediction of the Turbulent Flow Field Around a Ducted Axial Fan”, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University
(92,000 compute cores, 110 machine hours, 80 TB of data)
Objective: To better understand the development of vortical flow structures and the turbulence intensity in the tip-gap of a ducted axial fan.

(4) “Large-Eddy Simulation of a Helicopter Engine Jet”, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University
(94,646 compute cores, 300 machine hours, 120 TB of data)
Objective: Analysis of the impact of internal perturbations due to geometric variations on the flow field and the acoustic field of a helicopter engine jet.

(5) “Ion Transport by Convection and Diffusion“, Institute of Simulation Techniques and Scientific Computing, Universität Siegen
(94.080 compute cores, 5 machine hours, 1.1 TB of data)
Objective: To better understand and optimize the electrodialysis desalination process.

(6) “Large Scale Numerical Simulation of Planetary Interiors”, German Aerospace Center/Technische Universität Berlin
(54,000 compute cores, 3 machine hours, 2 TB of data)
Objective: To study the effect of heat driven convection within planets on the evolution of a planet (how is the surface influenced, how are conditions for life maintained, how do plate-tectonics work, and how quickly can a planet cool).

Demand for High Performance Computing on the Rise

Demand for High Performance Computing is unbroken. Scientists continue to crave for ever increasing computing power. They are eagerly awaiting the availability of even faster systems and better scalable software enabling them to attack and puzzle out the most challenging scientific and engineering problems. “Supply generates demand”, states Prof. Dr.-Ing. Michael M. Resch, Director of HLRS. “With the abilities of ultra-fast machines like Hornet both industry and researchers are quickly realizing that fully leveraging the vast capabilities of such a supercomputer opens unprecedented opportunities and helps them deliver results previously impossible to obtain. We are positive that our HPC infrastructure will be leveraged to its full extent. Hornet will be an invaluable tool in supporting researchers in their pursuit for answers to the most pressing subjects of today’s time, leading to scientific findings and knowledge of great and enduring value,” adds Professor Resch.

Outlook

Following its ambitious technology roadmap, HLRS is currently striving to implement a planned system expansion which is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2015. The HLRS supercomputing infrastructure will then deliver a peak performance of more than seven PetaFlops (quadrillion mathematical calculations per second) and feature 2.3 petabytes of additional file system storage.

More information about the HLRS XXL-Projects can be found at http://www.gauss-centre.eu/gauss-centre/EN/Projects/XXL_Projects_Hornet/XXL_Proj...

About HLRS: The High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) of the University of Stuttgart is one of the three German supercomputer institutions forming the national Gauss Centre for Supercomputing. HLRS supports German and pan-European researchers as well as industrial users with leading edge supercomputing technology, HPC trainings, and support.

About GCS: The Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) combines the three national supercom-puting centres HLRS (High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart), JSC (Jülich Supercomputing Centre), and LRZ (Leibniz Supercomputing Centre, Garching near Munich) into Germany’s Tier-0 supercomputing institution. Concertedly, the three centres provide the largest and most powerful supercomputing infrastructure in all of Europe to serve a wide range of industrial and research activities in various disciplines. They also provide top-class training and education for the national as well as the European High Performance Computing (HPC) community. GCS is the German member of PRACE (Partnership for Advance Computing in Europe), an international non-profit association consisting of 25 member countries, whose representative organizations create a pan-European supercomputing infrastructure, providing access to computing and data management resources and services for large-scale scientific and engineering applications at the highest performance level.
GCS has its headquarters in Berlin/Germany.

Andrea Mayer-Grenu | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.uni-stuttgart.de/

Further reports about: Aerodynamics Computing HPC High Performance Computing Center RWTH Supercomputing TB

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin display
19.02.2018 | University of Tokyo

nachricht Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
19.02.2018 | Georgia Institute of Technology

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

'Icebreaker' protein opens genome for t cell development, Penn researchers find

21.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

MEMS chips get metatlenses

21.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>