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World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action
(Berlin, October 12, 2016)

On Monday, the eighth World Health Summit concluded in Berlin with a record number of participants and a clear call to action. 1,800 participants from more than 90 countries attended the preeminent international conference for Global Health.

For three days, more than 250 speakers presented new developments in health in more than 40 sessions. Central topics: Migration and Refugee Health; Big Data and Technological Innovation in Healthcare; Infectious Diseases and Lessons Learned from Ebola to Zika; Women, Empowerment and Health.

WHS President Prof. Dr. Detlev Ganten: “These three days were permeated by an atmosphere of international cooperation across all borders. Participants included decision-makers from academia, politics, the private sector, and civil society, including four Ministers of Health and two Nobel Prize laureates”.

At the closing ceremony the M8 Alliance, the World Health Summit’s academic think tank, issued a declaration calling on heads of state and governments to invest in people and to ensure that no one is left behind.

Key demands of the M8 Alliance Declaration:

- Around the world, 130 million people need humanitarian aid, more than 60 million people have been forcibly displaced from their homes. Strategies for continuous medical support need to be developed.


- Antimicrobial resistance constitutes one of the central health challenges of today. To find sustainable solutions, cooperation has to be intensified on an international, national and regional level.


- There can be no progress in global health without addressing the health, education and empowerment of women and girls. Women have to have control of their life choices and bodily integrity. This includes the right of women to modern family planning.

The M8 Alliance Declaration is available online: http://bit.ly/M8-Declaration_2016

Under the high patronage of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President François Hollande and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, the WHS is the premiere international platform for exploring strategic developments and decisions in the area of healthcare.

Video recordings and photographs, free of attribution, will be available at: http://www.worldhealthsummit.org

For further information on speakers and topics see:
http://www.worldhealthsummit.org/the-summit/speakers
http://www.worldhealthsummit.org/the-summit/program

Save the Date:

World Health Summit 2017
October 15-17
Berlin

Press contact:
Tobias Gerber
Tel.: +49 30 450 572 114
communications@worldhealthsummit.org

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.worldhealthsummit.org

Tobias Gerber | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Big Data Infectious Diseases World Health

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