Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

What happens to the NAO? - Recent statistical analyses reveal loss of predictability

04.11.2014

A recently published article in the journal „frontiers in ecology and evolution“ by Joachim Dippner, Caroline Möller and Ingrid Kröncke showed by statistical analyses that the close coupling between climatic and biological data as it was valid for the period between 1977 – 2000 no longer is detectable in the following years.

The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), this interplay between Azores High and Icelandic Low, is decisively influencing the winter climate on the Northern Hemisphere. It is already known since the 1990s that there are four prevailing modes:

(1) a positive NAO phase, defined by an increased westdrift directing mild and humid air to Europe, (2) a negative NAO phase with strong conditions of easterly winds and cold winters in Europe as well as two blocking situations over (3) Scandinavia and (4) Western Europe.

Among the long series of meteorological readings, statistical analyses clearly reveal phases of consistent climatic regimes. Joachim Dippner and his co-authors have focused on three of them: a regime from 1977 to 1988 with NAO- predominant, a NAO+ regime from 1989 to 2000 as well as the following period until 2013. In parallel, they investigated the changes among the dominant species and taxonomic groups of the benthic macrofauna and the benthic community in the Southern part of the North Sea off Norderney.

The result shows that the shift between the two regimes NAO+ and NAO- also known as regime shift – is also reflected in changes within the benthos – the marine communities living on or in the seafloor.

After 2000, the picture changes considerably: a persistent NAO regime can no longer be detected. The authors name the NAO´s behavior chaotic. Simultaneously, abrupt changes occur in the benthic communities. They no longer can be related to any dominant NAO mode. Thus, future scenarios referring to the development of the ecosystems become increasingly difficult.

These findings were published under:
Dippner, J. W., C. Möller and I. Kröncke (2014). Loss of persistence of the North Atlantic Oscillation and its biological implication. Front. ecol. evol. 2: 57, doi:10.3389/fevo.2014.00057

Contact:
PD Dr. Joachim Dippner, Sektion Biologische Meereskunde, Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde, Tel.: 0381 5197 229

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch, Öffentlichkeitsarbeit, Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde, Tel.: 0381 5197 102

The IOW is a member of the Leibniz Association to which 89 research institutes and scientific infrastructure facilities for research currently belong. The focus of the Leibniz Institutes ranges from Natural, Engineering and Environmental Science to Economic, Social, and Space Sciences and to the humanities. The institutes are jointly financed at the state and national levels. The Leibniz Institutes employ a total of 17.200 people, of whom 8.200 are scientists, of which 3.300 are junior scientists. The total budget of the Institutes is more than 1.5 billion Euros. Third-party funds amount to approximately € 330 million per year. http://www.leibniz-gemeinschaft.de

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht International network connects experimental research in European waters
21.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Periodic ventilation keeps more pollen out than tilted-open windows

29.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Researchers discover dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecoystems

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

OLED production facility from a single source

29.03.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>