Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

What happens to the NAO? - Recent statistical analyses reveal loss of predictability

04.11.2014

A recently published article in the journal „frontiers in ecology and evolution“ by Joachim Dippner, Caroline Möller and Ingrid Kröncke showed by statistical analyses that the close coupling between climatic and biological data as it was valid for the period between 1977 – 2000 no longer is detectable in the following years.

The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), this interplay between Azores High and Icelandic Low, is decisively influencing the winter climate on the Northern Hemisphere. It is already known since the 1990s that there are four prevailing modes:

(1) a positive NAO phase, defined by an increased westdrift directing mild and humid air to Europe, (2) a negative NAO phase with strong conditions of easterly winds and cold winters in Europe as well as two blocking situations over (3) Scandinavia and (4) Western Europe.

Among the long series of meteorological readings, statistical analyses clearly reveal phases of consistent climatic regimes. Joachim Dippner and his co-authors have focused on three of them: a regime from 1977 to 1988 with NAO- predominant, a NAO+ regime from 1989 to 2000 as well as the following period until 2013. In parallel, they investigated the changes among the dominant species and taxonomic groups of the benthic macrofauna and the benthic community in the Southern part of the North Sea off Norderney.

The result shows that the shift between the two regimes NAO+ and NAO- also known as regime shift – is also reflected in changes within the benthos – the marine communities living on or in the seafloor.

After 2000, the picture changes considerably: a persistent NAO regime can no longer be detected. The authors name the NAO´s behavior chaotic. Simultaneously, abrupt changes occur in the benthic communities. They no longer can be related to any dominant NAO mode. Thus, future scenarios referring to the development of the ecosystems become increasingly difficult.

These findings were published under:
Dippner, J. W., C. Möller and I. Kröncke (2014). Loss of persistence of the North Atlantic Oscillation and its biological implication. Front. ecol. evol. 2: 57, doi:10.3389/fevo.2014.00057

Contact:
PD Dr. Joachim Dippner, Sektion Biologische Meereskunde, Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde, Tel.: 0381 5197 229

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch, Öffentlichkeitsarbeit, Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde, Tel.: 0381 5197 102

The IOW is a member of the Leibniz Association to which 89 research institutes and scientific infrastructure facilities for research currently belong. The focus of the Leibniz Institutes ranges from Natural, Engineering and Environmental Science to Economic, Social, and Space Sciences and to the humanities. The institutes are jointly financed at the state and national levels. The Leibniz Institutes employ a total of 17.200 people, of whom 8.200 are scientists, of which 3.300 are junior scientists. The total budget of the Institutes is more than 1.5 billion Euros. Third-party funds amount to approximately € 330 million per year. http://www.leibniz-gemeinschaft.de

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Bioinvasion on the rise
15.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Litter Levels in the Depths of the Arctic are On the Rise
10.02.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>